Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Any Comments on PMBOK 6th Ed?
Network:27



Hello All,

Those who are a PMI member ship and down loaded the PMBOK 6th Ed,or getting by other method, ( How you see it , expectation, Prep. test and new things about this issue??)

Thanks and regards,
Mansour
Sort By:
Network:236



Mansour -

The guide was just published last week so there's no exam related info available yet. PMI is targeting sometime in Q1/2018 for the exam update and PMP prep vendors will be updating their collateral over the next few months in readiness for that.

The changes in the guide relative to v5 are covered in detail within one of its Appendices.

From my perspective, things I liked included:

+ More coverage on the role and competencies of a PM
+ Incorporation of emerging trends, tailoring concepts and agile/iterative/adaptive considerations
+ The introduction for each knowledge area has been improved

Things I'm not so fond off:

+ The guide is a hundred pages bigger
+ Many more ITTOs than with v5
+ They dropped some useful tools such as Delphi Technique, Pareto Chart and Monte Carlo simulation

Kiron
...
1 reply by Carlos Tessore
Sep 13, 2017 1:00 PM
Carlos Tessore
...
I think Monte Carlo Simulation is in Quantitative Risk Management , page 433.
Network:84



Sep 13, 2017 11:31 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Mansour -

The guide was just published last week so there's no exam related info available yet. PMI is targeting sometime in Q1/2018 for the exam update and PMP prep vendors will be updating their collateral over the next few months in readiness for that.

The changes in the guide relative to v5 are covered in detail within one of its Appendices.

From my perspective, things I liked included:

+ More coverage on the role and competencies of a PM
+ Incorporation of emerging trends, tailoring concepts and agile/iterative/adaptive considerations
+ The introduction for each knowledge area has been improved

Things I'm not so fond off:

+ The guide is a hundred pages bigger
+ Many more ITTOs than with v5
+ They dropped some useful tools such as Delphi Technique, Pareto Chart and Monte Carlo simulation

Kiron
I think Monte Carlo Simulation is in Quantitative Risk Management , page 433.
Network:236



Sorry Carlos, I meant to say Critical Chain Method (I was going off my memory from the comparison I'd done last week) - Monte Carlo is still there, but they've dropped CCM.

Kiron
...
1 reply by Carlos Tessore
Sep 13, 2017 1:27 PM
Carlos Tessore
...
OK - Monte Carlo is a very powerful tool for us risk specialists.
Network:84



Sep 13, 2017 1:14 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Sorry Carlos, I meant to say Critical Chain Method (I was going off my memory from the comparison I'd done last week) - Monte Carlo is still there, but they've dropped CCM.

Kiron
OK - Monte Carlo is a very powerful tool for us risk specialists.
Network:69954



I'll be reading it this weekend. I'll let you know my thoughts. Did you check Saket's review?
...
1 reply by Saket Bansal
Sep 14, 2017 1:40 AM
Saket Bansal
...
Thank you for sharing my review here :-)
Network:326



Sep 13, 2017 1:50 PM
Replying to Stéphane Parent
...
I'll be reading it this weekend. I'll let you know my thoughts. Did you check Saket's review?
Thank you for sharing my review here :-)
Network:35



IMHO the expansion in Ch 1-3 of the description of scope to be anything related to change is both welcome and worrying.

Welcome because the treatment has at last started to take an investor perspective. Previous editions have been a supplier's toolbox divorced from where the business' decisions and project performance frustrations originate.

Worrying because the complexity of the ways to manifest job-roles that embrace the correct stand-point affects every level of any organisation's governance. A good thing in the long term.

Worrying because what will the exam content outline now contain? Industry is geared to 'train in a week' even if study then takes a month. 5th ed was a tough week. 6th looks like the camel's back will break.
Network:236



Simon -

That's a great point - what will the impact be on training providers who want to get prospective PMP candidates ready to write the exam. While I agree that the increase in ITTO's and overall size of the Guide is worrisome, if the underlying exam items continue to move more towards scenario questions rather than foundation/rote memorization, this shouldn't be an issue.

If we remember that the Guide is just one of multiple resources drawn upon for exam item writing, it helps to put things into perspective. There's nothing revolutionary which the standards volunteer team added to the Guide - it's all been captured somewhere else before, hence I don't see this as an expansion of the body of knowledge itself.

Kiron
...
1 reply by Simon Harris
Sep 14, 2017 2:13 PM
Simon Harris
...
Hi Kiron,

I think what we see with the 1,000 pages of this documentation is the pmi capitalising an opportunity from agile's struggle to penetrate corporate use outside of small team IT plus a mood that agile isn't so much a separate PM method as a component of the product-Development LC.

These 2 docs are a political grab for market-share that say "we are all things change". As such the modest change to the ITTO count and content is immaterial when compared to the seismic shift in the philosophical stance that now explicitly describes duties aligned to a scope that spans first-idea to steady-state benefits flow in one axis while incorporating predictive and adaptive PLC within iterative and single-pass pd-dlc along another axis.

The feet might be in roughly the same place but the gaze is to the heavens instead of the toe-caps.

The writing in this guide is both better considered and an absolutely enormous laundry-list of items at every illustrative expansion of a bullet. The breadth is now vast. The better guidance still has a few low-spots - for example the guidance on meetings at 10.2.2.6 is fantastically niave. SOME meetings might follow 10.2.2.6 needs but that is also the route to the most dysfunctional.

This now vast expanse really makes me wonder about the exam and about how organisations will adapt to be pragmatic in role boundaries, aligned responsibility to remuneration and being audit-able against by external assessors if the pmbok-g 6 is the reference point
Network:1334



Kiron has made a great brief here. I was part of the group of authors and reviewers and my work with the PMI was to homogenize the PMBOK and others related standards and practice guides to two topics: business analysis and agile. Trying to add something to Kiron´s comments you will find that today you have the guide in one part and the standard in the other both splitted. That adds clarity. Other important thing is: you will not find one reference to incorrect buzzwords like "agile project management". That is an important thing. And the difference between product requirements and project requirements, while the result is not what I think it must be in my opinion, have been differentiated because the business analyst role and the impact on project success too.
Network:35



Sep 14, 2017 6:37 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Simon -

That's a great point - what will the impact be on training providers who want to get prospective PMP candidates ready to write the exam. While I agree that the increase in ITTO's and overall size of the Guide is worrisome, if the underlying exam items continue to move more towards scenario questions rather than foundation/rote memorization, this shouldn't be an issue.

If we remember that the Guide is just one of multiple resources drawn upon for exam item writing, it helps to put things into perspective. There's nothing revolutionary which the standards volunteer team added to the Guide - it's all been captured somewhere else before, hence I don't see this as an expansion of the body of knowledge itself.

Kiron
Hi Kiron,

I think what we see with the 1,000 pages of this documentation is the pmi capitalising an opportunity from agile's struggle to penetrate corporate use outside of small team IT plus a mood that agile isn't so much a separate PM method as a component of the product-Development LC.

These 2 docs are a political grab for market-share that say "we are all things change". As such the modest change to the ITTO count and content is immaterial when compared to the seismic shift in the philosophical stance that now explicitly describes duties aligned to a scope that spans first-idea to steady-state benefits flow in one axis while incorporating predictive and adaptive PLC within iterative and single-pass pd-dlc along another axis.

The feet might be in roughly the same place but the gaze is to the heavens instead of the toe-caps.

The writing in this guide is both better considered and an absolutely enormous laundry-list of items at every illustrative expansion of a bullet. The breadth is now vast. The better guidance still has a few low-spots - for example the guidance on meetings at 10.2.2.6 is fantastically niave. SOME meetings might follow 10.2.2.6 needs but that is also the route to the most dysfunctional.

This now vast expanse really makes me wonder about the exam and about how organisations will adapt to be pragmatic in role boundaries, aligned responsibility to remuneration and being audit-able against by external assessors if the pmbok-g 6 is the reference point

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

"Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so."

- Douglas Adams

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors