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Is Scrum bigger than Agile?
I know Scrum is an Agile framework, adopted by more than half the organizations that have professed to have moved to Agile. But if Scrum ends up as a huge majority (compared to XP, Kanban etc.) say 90% utilization, could it end up competing one day with Agile by nominating itself as "Agile2" for example?
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Just to comment I have the opportunity to take other course with Scrum creators one month ago. Then I talked a lot with them. First percentages has no sense. Behind the truth always the truth is. You have to take into consideration the statistic sample. Second, Agile and methods to implement Agile are not the same thing. While Scrum becomes today a solution delivery framework Scrum is based on the Agile movement for software. So, anything that instantiate the Manifesto (values and principles) could be considered as a mean to implement Agile. Scrum is inside that category.
Can you share the scrum course you did Sergio, I am looking at the value of these Scrum courses. They differ widely.
Sante -

Scrum is a specific methodology based on agile principles.

Before taking a course in Scrum, I'd suggest downloading and reading the Scrum guide which has been recently updated: http://www.scrumguides.org/scrum-guide.html

Kiron
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1 reply by Sante Vergini
Nov 10, 2017 8:29 AM
Sante Vergini
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Thanks Kiron, been there, done that. Perhaps my question was not phrased properly. I totally understand that Scrum is a methodology based on agile, as prefaced by my opening comment. What I am wondering is if Scrum becomes huge, say 90% utilization under Agile, could it not one day call itself Agile 2 or some variation? The course I have done is Scrum is the Agile Scrum Master with Exin, but it might be another topic as to the relevance of all the Scrum certifications, as I believe Andrew pointed out in a good article on the comparison of PSM and CSM. I am trying to find the correct analogy of what it is I am trying to say, and when I figure that one out, I will be able to better articulate/clarify my question. But in a nutshell, the prodigy learns what the master teaches, with their own flavor (framework) of that teaching (principles). When the prodigy gets bigger, better, smarter, and attracts followers himself/herself, they supersede the former, and what was once attributed to the original teaching, gets lost in translation as if the prodigy was the originator, or at least a new era; ie. Agile 2. Sorry my mind gets too philosophical at times. I'm sure there is logic in there somewhere.
Scrum is just one of a few agile methods. But you also can use Scrum without being agile! If you really want to be agile you have to change the mindset - of team members and all involved managers in the organization. Agile is a different way of collaborate together not only a method.
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1 reply by Sante Vergini
Nov 10, 2017 3:04 PM
Sante Vergini
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Good point Peter, using Scrum without being Agile. Perhaps some companies want to adopt Agile without really know what it is or how to fully utilize it.
Nov 10, 2017 8:09 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
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Sante -

Scrum is a specific methodology based on agile principles.

Before taking a course in Scrum, I'd suggest downloading and reading the Scrum guide which has been recently updated: http://www.scrumguides.org/scrum-guide.html

Kiron
Thanks Kiron, been there, done that. Perhaps my question was not phrased properly. I totally understand that Scrum is a methodology based on agile, as prefaced by my opening comment. What I am wondering is if Scrum becomes huge, say 90% utilization under Agile, could it not one day call itself Agile 2 or some variation? The course I have done is Scrum is the Agile Scrum Master with Exin, but it might be another topic as to the relevance of all the Scrum certifications, as I believe Andrew pointed out in a good article on the comparison of PSM and CSM. I am trying to find the correct analogy of what it is I am trying to say, and when I figure that one out, I will be able to better articulate/clarify my question. But in a nutshell, the prodigy learns what the master teaches, with their own flavor (framework) of that teaching (principles). When the prodigy gets bigger, better, smarter, and attracts followers himself/herself, they supersede the former, and what was once attributed to the original teaching, gets lost in translation as if the prodigy was the originator, or at least a new era; ie. Agile 2. Sorry my mind gets too philosophical at times. I'm sure there is logic in there somewhere.
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1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Nov 10, 2017 11:20 AM
Kiron Bondale
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No doubt, a lot of the practices associated with agile originated with Scrum, but there's a lot to agile outside of Scrum as well including the principles and tools of Kanban, Lean, XP, DSDM, and of course, all the agile scaling frameworks including Nexus, LeSS, SAFe & DAD.

Kiron
Scrum is only a good fit for software development, Sante. There are many other industries that could and should have agile approaches to their projects and products. I find it hard to believe that Scrum could gather enough mindshare beyond IT to truly be a de facto standard.
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2 replies by Sante Vergini and Sergio Luis Conte
Nov 10, 2017 1:24 PM
Sergio Luis Conte
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Please let me disagree with that. I have used Scrum in several not software project. If you see the evolution DSDM and Scrum become Agile Delivery methods
Nov 10, 2017 3:09 PM
Sante Vergini
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Yes software is the dominant fit for Scrum Stéphane, but what about things like Scrumban, which utilizes some of Kanban's methods, which is great for repetitive processes like IT support (tickets etc.)?
Nov 10, 2017 8:29 AM
Replying to Sante Vergini
...
Thanks Kiron, been there, done that. Perhaps my question was not phrased properly. I totally understand that Scrum is a methodology based on agile, as prefaced by my opening comment. What I am wondering is if Scrum becomes huge, say 90% utilization under Agile, could it not one day call itself Agile 2 or some variation? The course I have done is Scrum is the Agile Scrum Master with Exin, but it might be another topic as to the relevance of all the Scrum certifications, as I believe Andrew pointed out in a good article on the comparison of PSM and CSM. I am trying to find the correct analogy of what it is I am trying to say, and when I figure that one out, I will be able to better articulate/clarify my question. But in a nutshell, the prodigy learns what the master teaches, with their own flavor (framework) of that teaching (principles). When the prodigy gets bigger, better, smarter, and attracts followers himself/herself, they supersede the former, and what was once attributed to the original teaching, gets lost in translation as if the prodigy was the originator, or at least a new era; ie. Agile 2. Sorry my mind gets too philosophical at times. I'm sure there is logic in there somewhere.
No doubt, a lot of the practices associated with agile originated with Scrum, but there's a lot to agile outside of Scrum as well including the principles and tools of Kanban, Lean, XP, DSDM, and of course, all the agile scaling frameworks including Nexus, LeSS, SAFe & DAD.

Kiron
Nov 10, 2017 8:40 AM
Replying to Stéphane Parent
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Scrum is only a good fit for software development, Sante. There are many other industries that could and should have agile approaches to their projects and products. I find it hard to believe that Scrum could gather enough mindshare beyond IT to truly be a de facto standard.
Please let me disagree with that. I have used Scrum in several not software project. If you see the evolution DSDM and Scrum become Agile Delivery methods
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1 reply by Stéphane Parent
Nov 10, 2017 1:39 PM
Stéphane Parent
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But would you call it a good fit for non-software projects, Sergio?

I can and have used Scrum with non-software development projects. I had to make adjustments to handle the difference in deliverables.
Nov 10, 2017 1:24 PM
Replying to Sergio Luis Conte
...
Please let me disagree with that. I have used Scrum in several not software project. If you see the evolution DSDM and Scrum become Agile Delivery methods
But would you call it a good fit for non-software projects, Sergio?

I can and have used Scrum with non-software development projects. I had to make adjustments to handle the difference in deliverables.
...
1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Nov 10, 2017 8:40 PM
Sergio Luis Conte
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Yes, it fits. Mainly because Scrum is a framewirk you can fill with tools an techniques best fits for you initiative
Nov 10, 2017 8:20 AM
Replying to Peter Puerckhauer
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Scrum is just one of a few agile methods. But you also can use Scrum without being agile! If you really want to be agile you have to change the mindset - of team members and all involved managers in the organization. Agile is a different way of collaborate together not only a method.
Good point Peter, using Scrum without being Agile. Perhaps some companies want to adopt Agile without really know what it is or how to fully utilize it.
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