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Resource management challenges
Network:1457



As a project manager have you ever had to work with little or no resources, if so how did you manage to meet your goals with that kind of challenge? Did you go an extra mile to get things done, if so what do you do to get the resources?
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Network:896



Anish -

It depends on what the relative priority of the project constraints are - if time & scope are flexible, you can still succeed with minimal resources. If this is before baselines are approved, then bake that risk into them. If it is post-baseline approval, it's an issue that you'll want to get resolved ASAP.

Kiron
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1 reply by Anish Abraham
Dec 04, 2017 1:40 PM
Anish Abraham
...
Kiron,
Thanks for the response. I'm concerned about the post-baseline, with little no support from functional managers.
Anish
Network:89910



It is not uncommon for the project manager to negotiate with functional managers for the resources necessary on the project. If need be, involve the sponsor to ensure that the project is given the necessary priority to get the people you need.
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1 reply by Anish Abraham
Dec 06, 2017 12:07 PM
Anish Abraham
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There are people in my team that are not reporting directly to me, so the problem is that I can't finish my work unless they finish and sign off the testing. I'm in charge and accountable for their testing, so need to keep track of them. This is not an easy situation to handle!!
Network:1457



Dec 04, 2017 1:16 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Anish -

It depends on what the relative priority of the project constraints are - if time & scope are flexible, you can still succeed with minimal resources. If this is before baselines are approved, then bake that risk into them. If it is post-baseline approval, it's an issue that you'll want to get resolved ASAP.

Kiron
Kiron,
Thanks for the response. I'm concerned about the post-baseline, with little no support from functional managers.
Anish
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Dec 04, 2017 3:14 PM
Kiron Bondale
...
Anish -

Now you are dealing with an issue where actual resource availability is below what was planned to achieve your schedule/scope/quality commitments. If the functional managers aren't being helpful and you are operating in a balanced matrix or weaker power model, it's likely time to get some assistance from the sponsor to see if he/she has better luck.

If not, you are facing a variance...

Kiron
Network:896



Dec 04, 2017 1:40 PM
Replying to Anish Abraham
...
Kiron,
Thanks for the response. I'm concerned about the post-baseline, with little no support from functional managers.
Anish
Anish -

Now you are dealing with an issue where actual resource availability is below what was planned to achieve your schedule/scope/quality commitments. If the functional managers aren't being helpful and you are operating in a balanced matrix or weaker power model, it's likely time to get some assistance from the sponsor to see if he/she has better luck.

If not, you are facing a variance...

Kiron
...
1 reply by Anish Abraham
Dec 06, 2017 11:17 AM
Anish Abraham
...
Kiron,
I'm working in a balanced matrix environment, and even my sponsor have problems in finding the right resources at the right time. As you rightly pointed out, yes I'm facing a variance.

thanks
Anish
Network:1601



Ever (hehehehe). I notice it when I made my first estimation. According to resource available then I can estimate the final end date. If the final end date is not the date expected by my stakeholders I work with them to review the estimations. If the situation still remain and their persists to maintain the final end date then I record a risk and I assign the risk to them (to one of them mainly the sponsor).
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1 reply by Anish Abraham
Dec 06, 2017 11:19 AM
Anish Abraham
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That's interesting. Thanks for sharing, Sergio.
Network:12226



Little resources yes, but I have never seen a project completed with no resources. Any resource constraints or issues can be justified and sold to management if they can see the value and benefit, and that can include negative value/benefit of not applying those resources.
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1 reply by Anish Abraham
Dec 06, 2017 11:20 AM
Anish Abraham
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Thanks Sante for your response.
Network:501



Functional Managers are not responsible, some cases(to my bewilderment) about the capacity and assignment of their resources. This occurs mainly because of competing priorities and them being short on resources to begin with. As a PM, I would not have baselined anything without raising a risk and getting a formal engagement of the resource for the project. But if it did happen, for whatever reason, escalating, raising the risks(evaluate the risk on triple constraints before raising), prioritize, and obviously escalate to the higher management. As a PM, I would not perform the task itself when it is supposed to be done by a tech resource(if so), as it would add more risks to the project and you become answerable in that case, more so than other ways.
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1 reply by Anish Abraham
Dec 06, 2017 11:12 AM
Anish Abraham
...
Thanks for your response.
Network:436



It is incumbent on the Project Manager to look at the "signed off" Project Charter given by the sponsor and estimate if the project work can be successfully achieved with the in-house resources that they have been provided.

The Human Resource Management Plan should outline how you will plan to acquire your project team.

To this end, Project Procurement Plan must involve "Buy" vs "Build" discussions with your Project sponsor.

Based on your discussion with the functional managers, lay it down to the Project Sponsor that the Project cannot be completed within time and within budget , due to the lack of resources in-house and therefore you may need to go to the market and source some resources.

Once you lay down all the facts in a structured way through a Project Management Plan, Senior management and Sponsors will wake up to the fact that you are not a Project Coordinator or an expediter in a "Mum and Dad's Firm" but a Project Manager who understands the Project Management and Delivery principles.

Having said that , I have often had to jump in and create a Solution Architecture Document or a similar Technical Deliverable because there were not enough technical resources in-house and the time frames were too tight.

Not an ideal scenario, but It is sometimes possible for you to leverage your domain expertise sometimes if the situation calls for it. However, you must highlight that this situation must not be made into a habit, because your main job is managing the project, not producing the deliverable.
...
1 reply by Anish Abraham
Dec 06, 2017 11:11 AM
Anish Abraham
...
Thanks for your feedback.
Network:1457



Dec 04, 2017 7:55 PM
Replying to Deepesh Rammoorthy, PMP®
...
It is incumbent on the Project Manager to look at the "signed off" Project Charter given by the sponsor and estimate if the project work can be successfully achieved with the in-house resources that they have been provided.

The Human Resource Management Plan should outline how you will plan to acquire your project team.

To this end, Project Procurement Plan must involve "Buy" vs "Build" discussions with your Project sponsor.

Based on your discussion with the functional managers, lay it down to the Project Sponsor that the Project cannot be completed within time and within budget , due to the lack of resources in-house and therefore you may need to go to the market and source some resources.

Once you lay down all the facts in a structured way through a Project Management Plan, Senior management and Sponsors will wake up to the fact that you are not a Project Coordinator or an expediter in a "Mum and Dad's Firm" but a Project Manager who understands the Project Management and Delivery principles.

Having said that , I have often had to jump in and create a Solution Architecture Document or a similar Technical Deliverable because there were not enough technical resources in-house and the time frames were too tight.

Not an ideal scenario, but It is sometimes possible for you to leverage your domain expertise sometimes if the situation calls for it. However, you must highlight that this situation must not be made into a habit, because your main job is managing the project, not producing the deliverable.
Thanks for your feedback.
Network:1457



Dec 04, 2017 6:05 PM
Replying to Deepa Kalangi
...
Functional Managers are not responsible, some cases(to my bewilderment) about the capacity and assignment of their resources. This occurs mainly because of competing priorities and them being short on resources to begin with. As a PM, I would not have baselined anything without raising a risk and getting a formal engagement of the resource for the project. But if it did happen, for whatever reason, escalating, raising the risks(evaluate the risk on triple constraints before raising), prioritize, and obviously escalate to the higher management. As a PM, I would not perform the task itself when it is supposed to be done by a tech resource(if so), as it would add more risks to the project and you become answerable in that case, more so than other ways.
Thanks for your response.
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