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Topics: Career Development
How do you determine your next certfication(s)?
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With the recent discussions on achieving past goals, and looking forward to 2018 on targets and certification goals, I wanted to gain further insight as to what motivates our community members in determining their certification bucket list.

What influences your decision?

Popularity, Interest, Work Requirement, Career Progression? A combination of several?

Tell us your story.
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when I graduated from college, I think there will be no lesson for me. but when I join work found I can't finish work well, I know I should learn more. then I got PMP certification this year. now I am learning english , maybe next three years I will get a PM-ACP certification.so when you feel the challenge from others but you don't want to be left. you will go to seek what you need. that's my opinion.
Network:5776



Dec 18, 2017 12:08 AM
Replying to Mounir Ajam
...
Personally, I do not really think highly of certifications, especially the most popular one. The problem is not the concept of certification but they way they are administered and offered where the focus is to pass an exam rather to really learn real - practical project management.

What I am trying to say, if you need a paper to prove something - go for it. However, you can learn much more by reading and applying; teaching your colleague a PM concept, research, write and present on PM topics. Identify weak areas in the PM practice in your organizations and find solutions.

I think for those who want to continue working with the same organization, finding solutions for weak or non-existing formal practices will get you more recognition and further advancement. In the career management four stages model - this is about moving from a colleague (one of the guys) to a mentor or a leader role.
Certifications are necessary and always will be. It's a short way to confirm at least a rudimentary level of specialization.
...
1 reply by Mounir Ajam
Dec 18, 2017 4:37 AM
Mounir Ajam
...
I wish I can agree

I have seen too many people with certifications that do not know the difference between:
1. Project Life Cycle and Process Groups
2. The difference between float and free float or how to use in real life situation

In my world, when I see a person with too many certifications - it is a turnoff not a plus.
Network:712



Dec 18, 2017 4:03 AM
Replying to Sante Vergini
...
Certifications are necessary and always will be. It's a short way to confirm at least a rudimentary level of specialization.
I wish I can agree

I have seen too many people with certifications that do not know the difference between:
1. Project Life Cycle and Process Groups
2. The difference between float and free float or how to use in real life situation

In my world, when I see a person with too many certifications - it is a turnoff not a plus.
...
1 reply by Sante Vergini
Dec 18, 2017 7:30 AM
Sante Vergini
...
I hope you don't say that on your next doctor's visit.
Network:243



I'm working more and more in IT and Engineering projects/programs. Since i've recertified CBAP, i'm planning in doing the PMI-ACP.
Network:5776



Dec 18, 2017 4:37 AM
Replying to Mounir Ajam
...
I wish I can agree

I have seen too many people with certifications that do not know the difference between:
1. Project Life Cycle and Process Groups
2. The difference between float and free float or how to use in real life situation

In my world, when I see a person with too many certifications - it is a turnoff not a plus.
I hope you don't say that on your next doctor's visit.
...
1 reply by Mounir Ajam
Dec 19, 2017 2:48 AM
Mounir Ajam
...
Sante

First, we are talking about PM not the Medical field

Second, Medical certifications have to go through an extremely challenging process and even with that there are bad doctors and if they screw up their licenses are stripped and in some countries even jailed

Third, in PM, many lie on their applications, the audit process is a joke, there is no evidence presented to verify qualification, and if you screw up, at worst you do not get a raise or a promotion or you go look for another job.

Even engineering certifications is extremely challenging in comparison to PMI certifications.

I love it (sarcastically) when we talk about certifications in PM, someone will always throw in the medical or legal field.
Network:712



Dec 18, 2017 7:30 AM
Replying to Sante Vergini
...
I hope you don't say that on your next doctor's visit.
Sante

First, we are talking about PM not the Medical field

Second, Medical certifications have to go through an extremely challenging process and even with that there are bad doctors and if they screw up their licenses are stripped and in some countries even jailed

Third, in PM, many lie on their applications, the audit process is a joke, there is no evidence presented to verify qualification, and if you screw up, at worst you do not get a raise or a promotion or you go look for another job.

Even engineering certifications is extremely challenging in comparison to PMI certifications.

I love it (sarcastically) when we talk about certifications in PM, someone will always throw in the medical or legal field.
...
1 reply by Sante Vergini
Dec 19, 2017 3:00 AM
Sante Vergini
...
Mounir, it's not much different tan doctors. PM's too can go to jail, and have. They can also be stripped of their credentials, and have. Doctors too can lie on their application. I know two US "doctors" that couldn't cut it in US medical schools, so went to the Philippines, finished a degree i medicine there, then did some bridging course for 1 year to qualify as a doctor back in the US again. One of the guys even pretended to have a former degree (one of the requirements to enter medicine in the Philippines is to have another former Bachelor's degree). My point was we need some kind of benchmark to ascertain someone's level of training /knowledge, and I guess certifications are it.
Network:5776



Dec 19, 2017 2:48 AM
Replying to Mounir Ajam
...
Sante

First, we are talking about PM not the Medical field

Second, Medical certifications have to go through an extremely challenging process and even with that there are bad doctors and if they screw up their licenses are stripped and in some countries even jailed

Third, in PM, many lie on their applications, the audit process is a joke, there is no evidence presented to verify qualification, and if you screw up, at worst you do not get a raise or a promotion or you go look for another job.

Even engineering certifications is extremely challenging in comparison to PMI certifications.

I love it (sarcastically) when we talk about certifications in PM, someone will always throw in the medical or legal field.
Mounir, it's not much different tan doctors. PM's too can go to jail, and have. They can also be stripped of their credentials, and have. Doctors too can lie on their application. I know two US "doctors" that couldn't cut it in US medical schools, so went to the Philippines, finished a degree i medicine there, then did some bridging course for 1 year to qualify as a doctor back in the US again. One of the guys even pretended to have a former degree (one of the requirements to enter medicine in the Philippines is to have another former Bachelor's degree). My point was we need some kind of benchmark to ascertain someone's level of training /knowledge, and I guess certifications are it.
...
1 reply by Mounir Ajam
Dec 19, 2017 3:46 AM
Mounir Ajam
...
Sante

Serious?

Where, in which country, in which accreditation body do they send PM to jail or strip them of their certification if they fail in managing a project or did not follow a PM methodology or guideline?

In relation to your doctor story, even that failed doctor has to go through more studies both in the Philippines and in USA to get his/her certification (per your story).

If we really want a benchmark for PM, IPMA have much better certification than PMI so how come they are not popular in project management community?
Network:712



Dec 19, 2017 3:00 AM
Replying to Sante Vergini
...
Mounir, it's not much different tan doctors. PM's too can go to jail, and have. They can also be stripped of their credentials, and have. Doctors too can lie on their application. I know two US "doctors" that couldn't cut it in US medical schools, so went to the Philippines, finished a degree i medicine there, then did some bridging course for 1 year to qualify as a doctor back in the US again. One of the guys even pretended to have a former degree (one of the requirements to enter medicine in the Philippines is to have another former Bachelor's degree). My point was we need some kind of benchmark to ascertain someone's level of training /knowledge, and I guess certifications are it.
Sante

Serious?

Where, in which country, in which accreditation body do they send PM to jail or strip them of their certification if they fail in managing a project or did not follow a PM methodology or guideline?

In relation to your doctor story, even that failed doctor has to go through more studies both in the Philippines and in USA to get his/her certification (per your story).

If we really want a benchmark for PM, IPMA have much better certification than PMI so how come they are not popular in project management community?
...
1 reply by Sante Vergini
Dec 19, 2017 4:26 AM
Sante Vergini
...
Just look at some buildings that have collapsed in several countries where they have thrown the contractor/PM in jail. I never said PM's were stripped from their credentials because they failed a project, we (and you) were talking about "bad" doctors, just like "bad" PMs who for example compromise their ethics will (and have) been stripped from their certification status. The doctor that got his degree did not have to go through the same level of training in the US at all, only 1 year, and if you saw the level of study they had at this particular university in Cebu City (which will go unnamed) you will know that his overall medical knowledge was low and yet he's a doctor now in the US. This doctor is story is leading us away from the real topic, and was only used to show that they too can lie on their application. Back on certifications, if IPMA have "much better" certifications, then more employers would ask for it in job adds, but they don't. I've seen maybe a few IPMA requests compared to the several hundreds for PMI (PMP) and Axelos (Prince2).
Network:712



I would like to get back to the main point of this thread

Andrew is asking about how you determine your new certification(s) and this is a valid question and many here are answering this with their advice and personal perspective, which is great and this is what we want from these discussions.

It seems that I am alone in offering an alternative approach for LEARNING and ADDING VALUE to organizations. What I have suggested is the following, to add value to your organization and to learn real - practical project management, there are alternatives and certifications is not the only way. Sure certifications is OK and could add value but, again, it is not the only way.

A blog post is coming :)
Network:712



Dec 18, 2017 12:43 AM
Replying to Deepesh Rammoorthy, PMPĀ®
...
Good advice from a theoretical point of view , but out there in an interview , apart from having knowledge of Project Management and /or Agile practices , you have to show the certification to back it up , the same way you have to show a university degree to backup your application for the job
I do not agree

One - please re-read my post again

Two, if I have confidence in my ability, I will challenge the interviewer to test me and test PMP or other applicants with real practical scenarios (not multiple choice questions) and let them observe who can demonstrate practical-applied know-how.

If the interviewer care more about the paper than the know-how, maybe it is not a place for me to be; unless I only care about a salary and not excellence
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