Project Management

Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Topics: Innovation, Organizational Project Management, Portfolio Management
Program vs. Mega Projects
Hello,

I have interacted with several young project managers and they seem confused about the major differences between Programs and Mage Projects.

In your experience, what is/are the core differences between Programs and Mega Projects (which can be divided into sub projects)?
Sort By:
Page: 1 2 <prev
Jan 08, 2018 8:50 PM
Replying to Najam Mumtaz
...
"A program is defined as a group of related projects, subsidiary programs, and program activities managed in a coordinated manner to obtain benefits not available from managing them individually.
Programs are not large projects. A very large project may be referred to as a megaproject. As a guideline, megaprojects cost US$1billion or more, affect 1 million or more people, and run for years."
This statement is as per Guide to PMBOK 6th edition.

Thanks Kiron, those are very useful links.
Najam, Kiron,

The statement is interesting but fall short of explaining the why. "Programs are not large projects" is an affirmation that is not explain.

I was on a megaproject, the way it was manage was much closer to a Program with many PM affected to 7 blocs that is close to a program. The benefit could not have been realized in a series of independent projects.

Reading the PMBOK statement doesn't clarify de distinction.
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Jan 09, 2018 2:48 PM
Kiron Bondale
...
Vincent -

For me, the key differentiator is that the rationale for structuring an initiative as a program is to derive sufficient incremental benefits that you wouldn't get by treating it as either one large project or a set of interdependent but independently managed projects.

However, I will say that it a grey area - a program in one organization is run as a big project in another. Mature organizations will profile their initiatives and come up with a set of criteria to clearly distinguish one from the other.

The term "mega-project" itself may be misleading... perhaps we should be calling them "mega-program".

Kiron
Jan 09, 2018 2:08 PM
Replying to Vincent Guerard
...
Najam, Kiron,

The statement is interesting but fall short of explaining the why. "Programs are not large projects" is an affirmation that is not explain.

I was on a megaproject, the way it was manage was much closer to a Program with many PM affected to 7 blocs that is close to a program. The benefit could not have been realized in a series of independent projects.

Reading the PMBOK statement doesn't clarify de distinction.
Vincent -

For me, the key differentiator is that the rationale for structuring an initiative as a program is to derive sufficient incremental benefits that you wouldn't get by treating it as either one large project or a set of interdependent but independently managed projects.

However, I will say that it a grey area - a program in one organization is run as a big project in another. Mature organizations will profile their initiatives and come up with a set of criteria to clearly distinguish one from the other.

The term "mega-project" itself may be misleading... perhaps we should be calling them "mega-program".

Kiron
Jan 08, 2018 5:47 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Anieta -

Assuming you are a PMI member, you should be able to access that issue of PM Journal on mega-projects here: https://www.pmi.org/learning/publications/...agement-journal

Also, Dr. Flyvbjerg has written a good overview article here: https://www.pmi.org/learning/library/know-...s-overview-2267

Kiron
Here is the link to the article by Bent Flyvbjerg: https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1409/1409.0003.pdf
What You Should Know About Megaprojects, and Why: An Overview
By Bent Flyvbjerg
Professor and Founding Chair of Major Programme Management
Said Business School
Oxford University
Page: 1 2 <prev  

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

"If you have an important point to make, don't try to be subtle or clever. Use a pile driver. Hit the point once. Then come back and hit it again. Then hit it a third time--a tremendous whack."

- Winston Churchill

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors

Vendor Events

See all Vendor Events