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Can you provide more than eight Constraints on Recruitment ?
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Let's list the constraints, I am starting with two and I will list them all later on

1.Diversity management
2.Inducements
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Salary ;-)
...
1 reply by Riyadh Salih
Feb 09, 2018 12:32 PM
Riyadh Salih
...
Yes Sante Cost
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Functional/Technological Knowlege
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Availability of suitable candidates
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The ones I can think of are:
1. reputation of the company: if the Employer does not have a good reputation (bad working condition, tensed environment, propensity for overtime imposed on people, chaotic, manipulative or bullying management, etc), it may be very hard to attract good candidates;
2. the nature of the job itself: is it boring, appealing, interesting, complex, physically intensive, having or lacking advancement opportunity, etc - may attract of deter applicants;
3. trade union requirements - they may be union agreements in place that reduce a lot the choice of management
4. government policies and laws in place: governments can put in place caps on the total number of certain skills that can be brought from a certain source, introducing barriers to protect own work force
5. internal organizational policies of the company: can restrict the management choices and act as a constraint on recruitment of new persons. A policy of filling up higher positions from outside can discourage competent persons to apply in such an enterprise (because of lack of promotion avenues).
6. organizational culture or industry culture: although not documented, organizations and industries work based on own prejudice produced by their own paradigm. For example, in mane parts: a shipyard is a male dominated industry; the health care and education systems are female dominated, etc. Entering the IT geek industry, the recruiter should convince the candidate about the amenities they can receive in the new working place.
In the same manner, national cultures can act as a constraint: there are places were there is a distinct tendency and expectation to hire the relatives of the management, of the experts or of the employees, as opposed to strangers.
7. recruiter's own experience and habit: prior successes of the recruiter will encourage him/her to tap into similar thinking patterns in deciding who to recruit. Although these habits bring in efficiency, there are times when they may act as pitfalls for the one indulging them.
8. competition in the specific labor market in which the recruiter is acting: the tighter the competition, the more difficult to find people within the constraints of the company (budget, time, expectations, etc). This competition will also act not only at the level of candidates but also between the recruiting companies. And recruiters may promise to you they are able to do all sort of things, when in fact their capability to recruit is fairly limited.
9. the state of the market in general: is it in a recession or is it flourishing?
10. the motivation of the recruiter itself to do a good job; usually the in-house company recruiters have little motivation for a successful hiring process; often they face a recruitment quota, seldom are thanked for or connected much with the other processes of the company to understand them, so they are the people "neglected, in the shadow".
11. The ability of the recruiter to understand the client's challenge, processes and picture the best candidate acting in the required position;
12. The tech level of the industry: the higher the level the more difficult to locate and attract; these are people who already have a good or interesting job and the recruiter's job is to bring in a more interesting alternative.
13. Reputation of the candidate / Resume - CV distrust - the recruiter may see something in the person's resume, CV or social media profile of the candidate that ring a bell to him/her, which makes the recruiter nervous about the candidate. And a good candidate may be lost just because it does not resonate with the recruiter.
14. Geographic constraints
Hope this helps. How these resonate with what you know or your experience?

Alina
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1. Any specific tool/domain experience
2. Salary
3. Attitude/behavioral management
4. People management
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Feb 09, 2018 3:49 AM
Replying to Sante Vergini
...
Salary ;-)
Yes Sante Cost
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@ Alina
Thank you for your detailed valued input in brief I would say

1.Organizational policies
2.Cost
3.Human Resource Plan
4.Inducements
5.Job Requirements
6.Environmental Conditions
7.Recruiter Habits
8.Diversity Management
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some more: Cultural Sensitivity (different from Diversity Management), labor laws, regulations.
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1 reply by Riyadh Salih
Feb 10, 2018 12:59 AM
Riyadh Salih
...
@Sante
Thank you for your valued input, I thought labour laws & regulations falls under EEF which same as Environmental conditions.
Environmental Conditions
External conditions strongly influence recruitment. Changes in the labour market and the challenges affect recruiting. The unemployment rate, the pace of the economy, spot shortages in specific skills, the size of the labour force, labour laws, and the recruiting activities of other employers—all of these factors affect the recruiter’s efforts.
Faced with a labour market that had a severe shortage of experienced drivers, Coastal Pacific Xpress Inc, a Surrey, British Columbia–based long-haul trucking firm, increased the pay of its owner-operators by 45 percent in four months to attract more recruits.19
Although these factors are considered in human resource planning, the economic environment can change quickly after the plan is finalized. To be sure that the plan’s economic assumptions remain valid, recruiters can check three fast-changing measures.
1. Leading Economic Indicators
Statistics Canada routinely publishes the direction of the leading indicators. The economic indices suggest the future course of the national economy. If these indices signal a sudden downturn in the economy, recruiting plans may have to be modified
2. Predicted versus Actual Sales
Since human resource plans are partially based upon the firm’s predicted sales, variations between actual and predicted sales may indicate that these plans also are inaccurate. Thus, recruiting efforts may need to be changed accordingly.
3. Employment Statistics
Statistics Canada routinely reports various employment statistics. Periodically, it produces reports on the state of employment in different industry sectors.
Employers can also monitor competition for specific job groups by looking at the ads in major newspapers. For clerical and production workers, who are usually recruited on a local basis, the human resource department may want to create its own ads index to monitor local changes in ads.
Organizations worldwide are likely to face a spiraling employee attrition rate over the next decade or so
Network:1633



Feb 09, 2018 5:36 PM
Replying to Sante Vergini
...
some more: Cultural Sensitivity (different from Diversity Management), labor laws, regulations.
@Sante
Thank you for your valued input, I thought labour laws & regulations falls under EEF which same as Environmental conditions.
Environmental Conditions
External conditions strongly influence recruitment. Changes in the labour market and the challenges affect recruiting. The unemployment rate, the pace of the economy, spot shortages in specific skills, the size of the labour force, labour laws, and the recruiting activities of other employers—all of these factors affect the recruiter’s efforts.
Faced with a labour market that had a severe shortage of experienced drivers, Coastal Pacific Xpress Inc, a Surrey, British Columbia–based long-haul trucking firm, increased the pay of its owner-operators by 45 percent in four months to attract more recruits.19
Although these factors are considered in human resource planning, the economic environment can change quickly after the plan is finalized. To be sure that the plan’s economic assumptions remain valid, recruiters can check three fast-changing measures.
1. Leading Economic Indicators
Statistics Canada routinely publishes the direction of the leading indicators. The economic indices suggest the future course of the national economy. If these indices signal a sudden downturn in the economy, recruiting plans may have to be modified
2. Predicted versus Actual Sales
Since human resource plans are partially based upon the firm’s predicted sales, variations between actual and predicted sales may indicate that these plans also are inaccurate. Thus, recruiting efforts may need to be changed accordingly.
3. Employment Statistics
Statistics Canada routinely reports various employment statistics. Periodically, it produces reports on the state of employment in different industry sectors.
Employers can also monitor competition for specific job groups by looking at the ads in major newspapers. For clerical and production workers, who are usually recruited on a local basis, the human resource department may want to create its own ads index to monitor local changes in ads.
Organizations worldwide are likely to face a spiraling employee attrition rate over the next decade or so
...
1 reply by Sante Vergini
Feb 10, 2018 5:30 AM
Sante Vergini
...
Riyadh, yes they do fall under EEF's, although "Environmental Conditions" are a little misleading.
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Diversity Management Programs

Where diversity management and employment equity programs exist, recruitment must also take these programs into account, employers cannot discriminate against people with physical disabilities unless the disability would prevent the person from doing the job after reasonable accommodation by the employer. Proactive employers such as the Vancouver International Airport use innovative recruitment programs to tap the skills of a diverse workforce:
Results of a Statistics Canada survey show that compared to non-disabled co-workers, 90 percent of people with disabilities did as well or better at their jobs, 86 percent rated average or better in attendance, and retention rates are 72 percent higher. Furthermore, most require no workplace accommodations (or if required they were generally inexpensive and tax-deductible). There are about 300,000 workers in British Columbia with disabilities, of whom 34,000 have college diplomas, 30,000 have trade certificates, and 28,000 have university degrees, yet people with disabilities are three times more likely to be unemployed than those without disabilities. Recognizing these facts and wanting to reflect the communities it serves, the Vancouver International Airport began actively recruiting people with disabilities to their “barrier-free” workplace. Now an entrenched hiring practice,Vancouver Inter'Airport considers disability issues when designing and planning for new facilities and renovations, and staff understanding of disabilities creates a better travel experience for customers
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