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Topics: PMI Standards
What is the best way to map out all the knowledge areas, processes, inputs, outputs, tools & techniques to study the PMBOK? Any suggestions are welcome.
Network:27



I’m studying for a PMI Exam, and have decided to try and parse the PMBOK into a master flow chart. Since every project is 3-dimensional, I’m having some trouble finding a good format. Any PMs out there try something similar?
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Network:1160



Don -

I wouldn't try to create a flowchart as most of the processes are iterative and the specific sequence can change depending on the context of a given project.

Memorization is a very small fraction of the questions on the exam - most are situational. You are much better off understanding the relationships between processes from an application perspective. For example, learning how the flow of deliverables (produced in the Direct and Manage Project Work process) through Control Quality which produces verified deliverables through Validate Scope which produces accepted deliverables.

There are many examples out there of visual flowcharts for the 47 processes but they tend to be overwhelming for the majority of PMP candidates.

Kiron
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1 reply by Don Henderson
Feb 21, 2018 11:39 AM
Don Henderson
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Thanks
Network:1562



In the PMBOK guide you will find a data flow diagram at the beginning of each process. This shows where does the input for the current process comes from and which processes do the outputs go into. I think this is a great way to understand the flow of PM work across process groups and knowledge areas.

In the exam ITTO is tested in a way that if you have understood the process you will be able to find the right option from the 4 choices.
Anyway best of luck!!
...
1 reply by Don Henderson
Feb 21, 2018 12:13 PM
Don Henderson
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Thank you.
Network:2034



Yes, came to say what Anish mentions above. And if you have the PDF version of the PMBOK, you can print those specific pages.

Something else to consider - as you get more and more familiar with how all the pieces flow and interconnect, you could create your own mappings based on some hypothetical scenarios. I get it, visualizing greatly helps to solidify concepts.

All the best!
...
1 reply by Don Henderson
Feb 21, 2018 12:15 PM
Don Henderson
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Merci.
Network:27



Feb 21, 2018 9:54 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Don -

I wouldn't try to create a flowchart as most of the processes are iterative and the specific sequence can change depending on the context of a given project.

Memorization is a very small fraction of the questions on the exam - most are situational. You are much better off understanding the relationships between processes from an application perspective. For example, learning how the flow of deliverables (produced in the Direct and Manage Project Work process) through Control Quality which produces verified deliverables through Validate Scope which produces accepted deliverables.

There are many examples out there of visual flowcharts for the 47 processes but they tend to be overwhelming for the majority of PMP candidates.

Kiron
Thanks
Network:27



Feb 21, 2018 10:52 AM
Replying to Anish Abraham
...
In the PMBOK guide you will find a data flow diagram at the beginning of each process. This shows where does the input for the current process comes from and which processes do the outputs go into. I think this is a great way to understand the flow of PM work across process groups and knowledge areas.

In the exam ITTO is tested in a way that if you have understood the process you will be able to find the right option from the 4 choices.
Anyway best of luck!!
Thank you.
Network:27



Feb 21, 2018 11:38 AM
Replying to Andrew Craig
...
Yes, came to say what Anish mentions above. And if you have the PDF version of the PMBOK, you can print those specific pages.

Something else to consider - as you get more and more familiar with how all the pieces flow and interconnect, you could create your own mappings based on some hypothetical scenarios. I get it, visualizing greatly helps to solidify concepts.

All the best!
Merci.
Network:104830



I fully agree with Kiron. If you understand the flow and know deeply how all processes flow with their inputs and outputs, if should be easy for you to recall.
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1 reply by Don Henderson
Feb 21, 2018 10:12 PM
Don Henderson
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Thanks.
Network:14743



Hi Don, don't make my mistake. Yes I memorized all the processes and T&T's for the exam. But that didn't help me pass the exam. What did was to really look at the flow of the processes and understand why they were so. Then you will start to see patterns, and the logic behind it. This will help you to recall the T&T's, especially the repetitive ones like OPA's and EEF's.
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1 reply by Don Henderson
Feb 21, 2018 10:17 PM
Don Henderson
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Thanks so much. I appreciate the cautionary tale.
Network:554



Hi Don, I think the key point was already mentionned by Kiron (and Rami and Sante). Keep the focus on understanding "the flow".
When I studied for my PMP I found several different maps but none really worked for me. Nevertheless, some memorization will be needed and useful under the stress of the exam.
Wish you good luck and a good study.
Network:16188



I did not memorize any ITTO for exam and I did not feel handicapped in attempting any question. Once you have gone through all the processes atleast twice and understood it's context you will be able to visualize by yourself that what could possibly be the Inputs, T&T or Output that process could have with the choices presented with the question.
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