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PMI CERTIFICATION IN CONSTRUCTION IS IT A REQUIREMENT
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is it a waste of time being certified in the construction industry. I have been advised its not relevant.
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Network:678



Unless things have changed - most construction companies do not care about PMI certification since they do not believe they add value. I only see construction companies invest in PMI certifications when their clients demand it.

However, individuals in construction companies might consider certifications thinking it could help their careers.
Network:4457



Depends on the construction company.
Network:1339



I am not an specialist in the field. What I heard from years and what I saw working with the global PMI and chapters in Latin America is that there is a enormous effort to push the certifications inside the construction niche without success. As @Mounir stated above construction firms did not see value. I will tell you why. Just in case of "bad practice" PMP certification is not legally actionable at all. That is because project management is not a profession formally speaking as you can find in other professions like medicine or engineering. So, why is the reason that will push an engineer to get the certification? They have a professional registration that has more value than PMP.
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Please let me add: I fully understand that to be an engineer does not mean to know about manage a project. In fact, I have participated as project manager in several construction projects. What I tried to pointed out in my previous comment is about the reasons to have or not to have PMP certification.
Network:678



Building on what Sergio said, there are many other factors

PMI has ignored this field - maybe they try to break it for certification but without adding value. Here are a few examples: Since 2000 or 2003, it took PMI about 14 years to revise the construction extension to the PMBOK Guide. During this period they have developed the Pg and Portfolio management standards and revised them 3 times (these are concepts used in IT and general business and not so much in construction. They also introduced Agile and PBA certification, and again - people in capital projects do not see vlaue in that.

Further, the concept of PMT (a must in capital projects) have been diminished and almost disappeared in recent editions, even in the 6th edition.

Years ago, when they used to be SIG - we had an Oil & Gas Petroleum (OGP SIG) and a SIG for Engineering and Construction - those were sidelined and disappeared.

Now, away from PMI, the construction and capital project industries, wants engineers. True that engineers are not trained as PM in universities, but they learn on the job - at least those being groomed for CM and PM jobs. So this is an industry that believes in learning by doing, learn in the trenches, learn on the job.

So, this industry cares about certification but maybe not PMI. For example, i think there are construction certifications. Also, AACE with Cost and Schedule certifications are closer to the capital projects world. Same for SAVE, and even IPMA in many countries is still keeping the doors open whereas PMI indirectly is closing the doors.

One final comment, although the sixth edition of the PMBOK Guide has many good things, it has some bad additions as well. Adding Agile in the guide and in every knowledge area is another nail (or bunch of nails) in PMI coffin in the capital project industry.
Network:901



I seem to agree with Mounir Ajam & Sergio. The saddest part that I felt in recent PMBOK release is the inclusion of Agile as "key" pillar to PMI standard. The PMP credential of 6th edition has separated further a part the construction industry PM to gain meaningful professionalism certification. Like Mounir said, PMI is closing door gradually for capital intensive project profession background.

I really look forward PMI could pursue separate credential of Professional Construction Project Manager as their next high-level commitment to support capital intensive industry profession. The PBMOK - Construction Extension is encouraging.
Network:1048



Hi Vincent, I am a Civil Engineer and all my life I am dealing with, resources, contracts, schedules, budgets, quality, and risks. Taking a PMP certification was definitely a plus to my career development. It helped me to become more productive and successful in my job role as a project manager.I urge you to study and wish you to earn the PMP certification.
Network:678



Inspired by these discussions, I expanded on what I wrote on this post and written a blog article about it
http://blog.sukad.com/20171025/are-pmi-cer...ction-industry/
Network:70274



It is only a waste if you don't get any value from the journey and the results.

We could continue discussing the industry's associated value to a PMP certification. At the end, you have to consider what value it adds for you.

As Michail alludes to, there is quite a lot of value-add in the process of becoming certified. It will make you a better project manager, regardless of what the industry tells you. I know it did for me.
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1 reply by Mounir Ajam
Oct 27, 2017 9:48 AM
Mounir Ajam
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If what you say is true - that the PMP makes you a better project manager then why did not the capital project industry accepts PMI certifications like commercial IT?
Network:678



Oct 27, 2017 9:11 AM
Replying to Stéphane Parent
...
It is only a waste if you don't get any value from the journey and the results.

We could continue discussing the industry's associated value to a PMP certification. At the end, you have to consider what value it adds for you.

As Michail alludes to, there is quite a lot of value-add in the process of becoming certified. It will make you a better project manager, regardless of what the industry tells you. I know it did for me.
If what you say is true - that the PMP makes you a better project manager then why did not the capital project industry accepts PMI certifications like commercial IT?
...
2 replies by Mounir Ajam and Stéphane Parent
Oct 27, 2017 10:06 AM
Stéphane Parent
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To use an old proverb, Mounir: "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder."

When I undertook my PMP certification in 2003, I was already an experienced project manager. I only saw getting the PMP as a notch on my belt. (My boss told me I had to get it.)

I found the process of studying, preparing and getting certified made me a better person and project manager. Did my boss tell me I was better? No. But deep down, I knew I was a better version of myself for it.
Oct 27, 2017 10:37 AM
Mounir Ajam
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Stephan

Sorry, my message was not clear, my apology. I was not questioning YOU or that the PMP adding value to you. The intent of the message is that the construction industry and capital project industry do not see value in the certification.

Also to be clear, that does not mean the PMP has no value. The industry does not see the value and one side of the reason is related to PMI and the other side is due to the industry mindset - see my latest blog, I expand on both points.

By the way, this is not about the PMP only - but PMI certifications in general, including CAPM, PgMP, and the rest.
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