Influence

Career Development   29
Risk Management   27
Talent Management   27

Project Expertise

  • 11 NODs (Note of Distinction)
  • The Art of Productive Laziness Workshop
  • PMO Mission, Goals, and Objectives: Business Driven vs. Theory Driven PMOs
  • Create Business Case
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 36 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Identify Project Team Member Requirements and Critical Knowledge Sources
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 2 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Present Business Case
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 6 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Define Project
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 196 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Determine Project Objectives
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 1 PMchallenge Question on this topic
    Define Project Scope
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 1 PMchallenge Question on this topic
    Select Project Approach
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 6 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Make Project Plan
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 349 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Define Work Breakdown Structure
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 24 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Estimate Effort
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 1 PMchallenge Question on this topic
    Obtain Project Plan Approval
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 11 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Publicize Project
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 24 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Equip Project
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 15 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Train Project Team
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 4 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Control Project
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 1 PMchallenge Question on this topic
    Assign Project Tasks
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 20 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Motivate Project Participants
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 40 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Track Project Progress
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 173 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Revise Project Plan
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 95 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Obtain Approval for Revisions
    Talk about your experiences and what makes you successful. Is there a special technique that you use on this stage step or task? What have you learned? What is the impact on the organization?
    Prepare Completion Report
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 9 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Summarize Project Results
    It is important to leave the project in an unambiguous state. Requirements may have been removed from scope and the team needs to be reminded of why it did not occur. You don’t want the project to be criticized for doing the right work because someone didn’t want to search though the change log!

    Most likely, there will be follow-up activities or a subsequent project related to yours. You want the next PM and project Team to be able to quickly determine what was accomplished, and how much progress may have been made towards potential deliverables for the next team. At a minimum, they need to know what foundation you left for them to build upon.
    Identify Lessons Learned
    Capturing the Lessons Learned serves a couple of important functions. The primary goal is to ensure the next project can build upon the positive experiences, and to avoid the pitfall your team encountered. Another, often overlooked benefit is to give the team a last chance to “vent” about their experience.

    Something (perhaps even unavoidable) may have been particularly challenging to one individual. Letting this person speak the will help to provide them with closure on what may have been a negative experience. This may help them team member reflect upon the project in a more favorable light because you cared enough to listen. In this situation, I often find other team members are able to jump in a remind them of the benefits they received from the challenge. “If you hadn’t done that, we would not be able to . . . .” This helps remind the resource what they really accomplished.

    Particualr effort which may have been especially difficult may be one of the project's most useful features. You want the team to leave the project feeling good about their accomplishments – even if the work was challenging.
    Collect Project Metrics
    These metrics tell a story you can’t capture in Lessons Learned and yet prove what went well and what needs improved upon. By the time the project has implemented it’s oftentimes viewed as a” done deal”. Reminding the users what it took to get the deal done will help them become good stewards of their system just knowing how much the organization was willing to invest in the improvements. It’s also essential to remind sponsors and the enterprise why the money was spent.

    Further, a simple, concise report quantifying the project’s results helps solidify the team’s accomplishment. After a successful deployment, it’s valuable to remind the team what they did and how well it was accomplished.
    Turn Over Results
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 3 PMchallenge Questions on this topic
    Identify Reusable Objects
    The next, similar project needs to be able to quickly determine what was accomplished by the present project, and if any progress was made towards any potential deliverables for the next team. They need to know what foundation was left for them to build upon. This is where your concern for your project must be set aside. Here is where you focus upon the next team. Here is where you may need to share the "dirty laundry" so a future team can help clean up anything left behind.
    Release Project Resources
    Bruce A. has correctly answered 1 PMchallenge Question on this topic