Project Management

Innovation


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Agile Classrooms + Empathy Maps

podCast
by Dave Prior

John Miller, among others, is on a mission to reinvigorate youth education in the most challenging environments through the agile principles of empowerment and collaboration. Here he discusses how it’s going, including a visual technique called empathy mapping that makes a real difference, in and out of the classroom. [36:45]

Here Comes Microservices

Jinesh Parekh

Microservices is an emerging approach to software development that breaks down complex applications into smaller components or processes. It embraces DevOps, complements agile, and can provide better scalability and resilience, among other benefits. But it also requires significant organizational change, and it isn’t a silver bullet; in fact, it can make a mess. Is it for you?

Creative Disruptors

by Kathleen Ryan O'Connor

A research institute is sidestepping bureaucratic barriers to innovation and spurring leadership across all organizational levels by applying Silicon Valley approaches to the more staid field of education. The model has delivered some winning outcomes, and now ideas are pursued without fear of failure.

Prepare to Pitch

by Tim Kress

For project managers to advance into senior-level, strategic roles, they must call on their relationships, experience and expertise to actively identify opportunities that can benefit the business. Equally important, they must be able to “sell” these ideas by connecting them to the organization’s priorities, competencies and values.

Create a Productivity Culture

by Eric Bloom

Productivity is the art of doing more with the time, money and resources at your disposal. To enhance the productivity of an organization or team — be it streamlining processes, improving communications or fostering innovation — leaders need to pay attention to these six cultural attributes.

Structure Meets Inspiration

by Kathleen Ryan O'Connor

Most project management processes — assigning deadlines, monitoring resources —originated in IT and manufacturing. But they don’t translate well when applied to the creative world of an all-digital agency where products are often borne out of inspiration. So how do you manage a project that is dependent on spontaneity?

A Nudge to Innovation

by Linda Rising and Mary Lynn Manns

Change initiatives can be mentally and physically taxing because it is more challenging to be in a “mindful” state of learning something new than in a “mindless” state of doing the familiar. Physical or cognitive “nudges” help — not by forcing adoption of new ideas, but by creatively eliminating obstacles so that it happens naturally.

Piggyback Your Idea

by Linda Rising and Mary Lynn Manns

When faced with procedural obstacles to introduce a new idea, change champions should look for a way to piggyback on well-accepted practices in the organization. If you can “market” a new idea as an add-on or a small improvement to an established practice, you are likely to meet less resistance.

Opportunity Agility

by Bart Gerardi

Agile organizations are always learning from their customers and their products, using them as guides to new ideas and opportunities. They also bring an agile mindset to selecting and executing the ideas they pursue, making advances iteratively through a continuous cycle of different initiatives at different stages.

Ideas Win with Wider Input

by Linda Rising and Mary Lynn Manns

Leading change is not a one-person job. For a new idea or innovation to succeed across an organization, the effort’s “champion” should encourage everyone possible to contribute and claim ownership of some part of it. Diverse input also helps everyone learn more about the idea and their organization.

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"A doctor can bury his mistakes but an architect can only advise his client to plant vines."

- Frank Lloyd Wright