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53 items found

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Innovation on R&D Earned Value IOC/C21 WatchKeeper System

by Kevin Peterson

The challenge addressed in this article is that of using earned value in an IT project of less than US$20 million with multiple solution partners, fixed cost contracts, no labor cost data, and an 18-month deadline. The discussion presents an example of an innovative use of a research and development (R&D)–based earned value technique. The software project overview is presented, traditional earned value reviewed, the derivation of the R&D approach is discussed, and the article closes with a look at the organizational benefit of the technique.

Earned Value Management in “Electricity Bill” Type of Projects

by Sunil Raikhanghar

Earned value management (EVM) is the control tool used for cost control, which is one of the most important areas in project management. It also provides additional useful information for the schedule variance. When used with progress reporting to determine schedule variance and schedule performance index, EVM becomes a highly valuable tool to track both cost and schedule. Budgets for projects with only department-wide budget allocations are analogous to a household electricity bill, having few details.

Impact of Revenue Recognition Methods in Project Cost Control Through Earned Value

by Francisco-Javier Rodríguez

One of the inputs earned value management (EVM) uses to obtain an indicator about the cost performance of projects is the cost incurred by the project until a certain date. Typically, such information is provided by finance departments. This paper reviews the different methods used by finance departments to calculate and measure the incurred costs in projects, and how these methods may impact the way the project manager applies the EVM to measure, control, and track the status of his or her project.

Implementing Earned Value Side by Side With Critical Chain

by Gershon Ben-Israel

This article focuses on an easy-to-use implementation of earned value management (EVM) and, specifically, cost performance index and estimation at completion - Cost side by side with the Critical Chain Method. The EVM implementation gives a comprehensive answer for budget management and budget report requested by the project sponsor.

Work in Progress Earned Value Management (“WIPing” EVM into Shape?)

by Remi St-Martin, David Fannon

This article presents a variant on the use of schedule performance index (SPI) and schedule variance (SV) to manage schedule performance and includes a description, rationale, and explanation on how to apply the technique. An actual project, as well as examples, are used to illustrate the value and application of the technique. A basic understanding of earned value management (EVM) is required to understanding the article, whereas actual practice using earned value management, schedule performance index, and schedule variance is recommended.

Framework for Integrating Project Quality, Risk Management, and Integration Management into Earned Value Management (EVM) for Deriving Performance Based Earned Value (PBEV)

by Ravi Yerabolu

Multidimensional project control systems, which integrate the critical to quality metrics of the project quality management, risk management, and program integration requirements into the earned value management system, delivers capability for the enterprise project team(s) in measuring the performance-based earned value of the project deliverables.

The Use of Task Rates in Monitoring and Evaluating Projects

by Francisco J. Toro

The author presents an approach for using a rate to monitor projects, based on the re-evaluation of two key concepts, work total, and the rate per unit of work. By periodically recalculating and updating rate values, considering the comparison of the actual work vs. the planned work, the project manager may develop reliable databases for use in future evaluations and follow-up projects.

Preparing for the Exam with PMBOK Guide—Fifth Edition (Part 6): Cost Management

by Bruce Garrod

The latest in the ongoing series of articles helping you get “PMP fit” explores the often avoided Project Cost Management knowledge area. To paraphrase a well-known company, just get at it. When you have read this article and completed your studying, you may well be asking yourself why you were so concerned about it…

Topic Teasers Vol. 51: Why Bother With Earned Value?

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: Computing Earned Value (EV) has always been challenging for me, and frankly I don’t see the benefit to my project. I learned to do the math for my PMP certification, but is there a clear and simple way to get the figures, make the calculations and then find a meaningful use for those numbers? My projects keep veering off track and I need a new approach.
A. Depending on their personality type, some managers are sticklers for details. The more metrics, the better. EVM translates project data into numbers to forward to management, but has less value for the project manager who is running the project day to day.
B. While PMP prep does a great job of explaining the math of Earned Value Management (EVM), keeping the focus on information needed to pass the test means there is seldom time to go into the subject of how useful EVM can be in the workplace. It is a key tool for running successful projects.
C. Since the U.S. Department of Defense requires EVM for all of its departments and departmental contractors, there are favorable tax advantages for corporations who can state their profit figures in EVM terms.
D. EVM provides a common language that the project manager, team and management can use to communicate about how much time and how many resources should be allocated at the first of a project in order to ensure that it will be guaranteed to meet the estimated project metrics of time, cost and quality.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Is Earned Value Management a PM Technique?

by David Stark

Earned value management is widely valued as a key project management technique. Despite this, it’s not a universally accepted tool for use by project managers. This article questions whether or not EVM is correctly defined as a PM technique. Is there an alternative way of looking at EVM and EVMS, one that may bring better understanding of how they interact--and under what circumstances they can be used in to support project managers?

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