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15 items found

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Objective Comparison of Project Complexity and Performance of Project Managers in the Banking Environment

by Ivan Poliacik, PhD, PMP

Evaluation of project manager performance after completion can be a challenging part of any project. Use of objective criteria to measure project complexity should supplement evaluation of scope-time-budget performance and subjective factors. The author provides a comparison matrix, designed for a banking environment, that can be applied to any area of project management. The comparison matrix can also be published to the team, to compare performance with colleagues and for self-evaluation.

Object-Oriented Project Management (O2PM) Objectizing Work

by K.R. Chandrashekar

Most of the project management methodologies are task based, thus demanding the project manager orchestrate continuously to maintain the health of the project. O2PM is a new project management methodology that marries two well-developed areas—object-oriented analysis and project management. In O2PM, we move away from the task-based allocation of work to the deliverable-based allocation of work, which will bring about many changes in the way we look at work allocation and monitoring.

Occam’s Razor for Work Breakdown Structure and Three-Dimensional Time Scheduling

by Oleksandr Tugayev

This article is about Deliverables – Activities – Time (DAT) charts—a new three-dimensional presentation of the classic instruments in project management: Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and Gantt and PERT charts. The aim is to create simpler and more presentable project management charts.

One Size (Does Not) Fit All

by Anand Padhye

The most widely used project management methodology is the waterfall model. In this model the progress of a project is seen flowing steadily downwards (like a waterfall) through the phases of conception, initiation, analysis, design (validation), construction, testing and maintenance. It should be apparent that this model has its origins in the manufacturing and construction industries. And that raises a question: Do all information systems projects need to follow the same model?

OPCV™: The One-Page Curriculum Vitae

by Alessandro Cervellin

Decision makers typically have a short amount of time to select a candidate who best fits a job position and the One-Page Curriculum Vitae (OPCV) provides a useful tool. By using a timing diagram, it is possible to evaluate the time sequence of the most meaningful information and, at the same time, to evaluate previous professional experiences and activities.

Operations as a Final Destination to Successful Project Delivery

by Dr. Nidhi Gupta, BDS, MBA, PMI-ACP, PMP

Operations play a critical role in the successful maintenance and sustainability of products or services once they are released into production. Employing a disciplined approach to operations management can lead to increased effectiveness, cutting costs and a competitive advantage.

Optimizing Project Costs While Maintaining Scope

by Josephine Rando

Often, if the planned costs do not meet project budget, the project manager will change the scope or finish date of the project to meet the budget constraints. Occasionally, however, it is possible for the project manager and the project team to develop creative means by which to adhere to the budget and still meet the project timeline and implement the original scope. This article is based on an actual project from a Fortune 500 company that was launched successfully in 2009. The project underwent major budget reductions while its original scope and time schedule were preserved. This article describes a broad set of project management activities that the project team managed throughout the project life cycle while reducing overall project costs and maintaining the integrity of the project.

Organizational Change: A Possibility, Not a Farce

by Amir Nasiri, PMP

How can one successfully change the culture of an organization or an entity to think and act differently? When one thinks about organizational change and the subsequent consequences, you must ask the question, "Why should I go through this change and the hassle and stress that come with it?" The answer is very easy--the long-term benefits outweigh the short-term risks.

Organizational Culture and Its Effects on Project Management

by Sunil Raikhanghar

Organizational culture is made up of the attitudes, values, beliefs, and behaviors of its employees and underlying assumptions. If an organization’s culture is not supportive of project management, project management tends to be viewed as an additional burden and interference to the daily work. If there is no effective project management office and no standard processes, procedures, measurement, and organization culture across projects, projects will operate differently from one project to the next as well as from one department to the next. Project culture within an organization can essentially can make or break the projects undertaken by that organization.

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