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10 items found

Under the Influence

by Dan Vickers Curt Finch

Project managers rarely have direct control over anyone on their teams; they don’t rule by decree. But good project managers do exert influence, which is more effective than making demands anyway. Strong leadership, with or without official authority, requires constant refinement of techniques and personal tactics. Here are five standards to keep in mind.

Unlearning PM: Don't Task, Don't Tell

by David Schmaltz

Can projects managers better serve their teams and achieve more valuable results by not getting involved in task-level planning? Yes, because the real-time judgment of those who are executing the tasks will probably be more constructive and insightful than a detailed plan created before work even began. It’s not abandoning the plan, but using it more as hypothesis than directive.

Unlearning PM: Seeing Different

by David Schmaltz

Most project managers are introduced to a way of seeing projects that is more reductive than holistic — more focused on work breakdown than flow and value creation; more metrics-measured than self-regulating. In Part Two of the series, the author explains why an emphasis on inputs, outputs and certain processes might hinder performance and, ultimately, project value.

Unlearning PM: The Control Dilemma

by David Schmaltz

Widely used project control methods often require more maintenance than the systems (and the people) they are intended to control. The pursuit of control becomes more burden than value facilitator. But on real-world projects, independent agents act in ways no closed-loop or anticipatory control mechanism could predict — and often for the better.

Unlearning PM: Who’s Managing Whom?

by David Schmaltz

However you might define project control, you should question its purpose before attempting to accomplish it. Otherwise, you may default to a control strategy poorly matched to your intentions and your project’s purpose. There’s considerable evidence that individuals, not managers, PMOs or progress reports, exert the most meaningful control over successful projects, and that external controls compromise this inherent capability.

Using Reflection to Improve Your Leadership Skills

by Bruce Harpham

Need some powerful techniques to improve your leadership skills? You don't need a promotion to put these skills to use. Instead, you can start to practice these skills in your next project meeting.

Using Software Project Metrics

by Don Beckett

Software measurement by itself does not resolve budget, schedule or staffing issues for projects or portfolios, but it does provide a basis upon which informed decisions can be made. Here are examples of how to use metrics to determine present capabilities, assess whether plans are feasible, and explore trade-offs if they are not.

Using Success as a Motivator

by Andy Jordan

We all want to achieve the most success we can from our efforts in the workplace, but how do you leverage that to enable even greater achievements, regardless of the circumstances?

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