Project Management
ALL    DOWNLOADS    ARTICLES    REFERENCE    PROCESS    ON-DEMAND WEBINARS   
TOOLS    TRAINING    LIVE WEBINARS    USER-GENERATED
Aerospace and Defense,    Agile,    Benefits Realization,    Requirements Management,    Business Analysis,    Career Development,    Change Management,    Citizen Developer,    Communications Management,    Construction,    Consulting,    Cost Management,    Disciplined Agile,    Earned Value Management,    Education,    Energy and Utilities,    Ethics,    Organizational Culture,    Financial Services,    Government,    Healthcare,    Innovation,    Integration Management,    Information Technology,    Leadership,    Lessons Learned,    New Practitioners,    Organizational Project Management,    Outsourcing,    Pharmaceutical,    Using PMI Standards,    PMO,    Portfolio Management,    Procurement Management,    Quality,    Resource Management,    Risk Management,    Scheduling,    Scope Management,    Scrum,    Strategy,    Sustainability,    Stakeholder Management,    Talent Management,    Teams   

Language: All    English    Arabic    French    Japanese    Korean    Portuguese    Romanian    Russian    Spanish   
Access: All    Free    Premium   
Sort By: Newest    Title   
  All   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z   ¿  

8 items found

Teachable Moments: Ready for Disaster

by Sean Carroll, PMP, SPHR, SHRM-SCP; Scott Calhoun, P.E., PMP; Sean P. Hannigan, P.E.; Garrett Meyer; Jason Smith

The flawless maritime response to the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings validated the campaign to change the status quo and prepare for the unthinkable through benchmarking, validation, consensus, training and implementation.

The Eagle Has Been Managed Successfully

by Mike Donoghue

When it comes to technology projects that a national government must undertake, NASA is a formidable force in the development of future ventures.

The Peril of Partnership

by Mark E. Salesky

The "peril of partnership" is when a business uses a “partnering” theme woven into its proposal, on the mistaken belief that the government really welcomes a partnership. The author argues that a vendor can be more competitive and match better to government expectations by positioning itself as a reliable performer and demonstrating a willingness to pursue cost economies.

The Top Ten Ways to Score Well in a CAM Interview

by Tony Trinh

You just found out that you’ve been selected to be interviewed by government auditors from the Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA) about the control accounts you manage. Don’t you wish there was a quick reference on how to score well on the interview? This article may be the source you need to get into the mind of an auditor so you are prepared when he or she arrives.

Topic Teasers Vol. 49: Working Government Contracts

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: I’m a PMP and an experienced project manager, but I just landed a great job in a government agency. We are working out procurement contracts, and I must admit that I’ve never heard of most of these contract name types they are throwing around. Does the government do different contracts that those we were taught in our training?
A. Within the federal agencies there is one sole source for tangible goods and a second for people who might be subcontracted into jobs on a project-by-project basis. These sources are reconsidered every four years. Depending where you are in the cycle, you will either use the source already in place or you may have a voice in choosing the next source.
B. The federal and state governments each make their own rules about procurement. There is no common thread of how it is done; therefore, if your project spans several states you will need a separate purchasing agreement and supply source for each state.
C. Government projects are run in exactly the same way that other projects operate under the supervision of a PMP, so check the version of A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) from the year you were certified to see what procurement guidelines you should follow.
D. There are some general ways you can learn in which government contracting differs from traditional private sector contracts, but check the details with your agency as laws and agency practices differ from year to year. You may have to make small adjustments in your practices as new rules are legislated.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Topic Teasers Vol. 70: Compliance Challenges

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: We need to make some alterations in the way we manage our internal software and the access employees have to protected data. Now an audit shows we need to make specific changes immediately or pay a huge fine. Is there any way to avoid this embarrassment in the future and protect our public image?
A. International and federal regulations must be complied with, and knowing which regulations apply to your type of business so you can merge compliance into your plans at the project level will help satisfy the mandatory requirements to avoid large fines in the future.
B. Most staff members are reluctant to move forward with required changes to their daily routine, whether technological or manual. To get their cooperation and meet the audit list, fire the first three people who speak out in opposition. Setting an example clearly conveys that this change will occur with or without the agreement of the employees.
C. If your organization has been running smoothly and profitably, ask the legal team to search the past rulings to find ways to avoid altering the violation items listed by the compliance inspectors.
D. Each type of business has a single federal mandate to govern how they manage their profits. Know that the depreciation versus capitalization of corporate expenses should be recorded and tracked to meet audit specifications.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Transitioning from the Private Sector into Government PM

by Joe Wynne

Those that have managed projects in a government agency after experience in the private sector have noted a difference in expectations for participation in projects, roles and responsibilities, and readiness for project success. Learnings from our Government topic section will help you take an effective consulting role in your transition into the public sector. The tactics described here will help you ask the right questions to succeed.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENTS

"If you havenÆt got anything nice to say about anybody, come sit next to me."

- Alice Roosevelt Longworth