Project Management
ALL    DOWNLOADS    ARTICLES    REFERENCE    PROCESS    ON-DEMAND WEBINARS   
TOOLS    TRAINING    LIVE WEBINARS    USER-GENERATED
Aerospace and Defense,    Agile,    Benefits Realization,    Requirements Management,    Business Analysis,    Career Development,    Change Management,    Citizen Developer,    Communications Management,    Construction,    Consulting,    Cost Management,    Disciplined Agile,    Earned Value Management,    Education,    Energy and Utilities,    Ethics,    Organizational Culture,    Financial Services,    Government,    Healthcare,    Innovation,    Integration Management,    Information Technology,    Leadership,    Lessons Learned,    New Practitioners,    Organizational Project Management,    Outsourcing,    Pharmaceutical,    Using PMI Standards,    PMO,    Portfolio Management,    Procurement Management,    Quality,    Resource Management,    Risk Management,    Scheduling,    Scope Management,    Scrum,    Strategy,    Sustainability,    Stakeholder Management,    Talent Management,    Teams   

Language: All    English    Arabic    French    Japanese    Korean    Portuguese    Romanian    Russian    Spanish   
Access: All    Free    Premium   
Sort By: Newest    Title   
  All   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z  

9 items found

Teachable Moments: Occupied Dwellings

by Paul Meredith B.Sc. (Hons), MRICS, PMP

Teachable moments are formed when you have done something--regardless of the outcome--and learned from the experience. Learning makes us better at what we do and provides a great opportunity to develop others and sharpen skills. We’ve compiled our best Teachable Moments from our community members for you to learn from and share with other project managers. In this installment, we share a case study of how a client upgraded its existing fire protection systems in several homes occupied by senior citizens across Canada.

The Dimensional Approach to Scope Creep Management in Construction Projects

by Abiodun Adewale Sorinolu

The efficient delivery of construction projects will be greatly enhanced if project managers focus their efforts on developing measures for identifying, monitoring, and managing scope creep in projects of any size. This article seeks to provide answers to the following questions: What is scope creep? When does it happen (identifying? Why does it happen (monitoring)? And, how can it be prevented from happening (managing)?

The Fast Track to Delay

by Ahmed Fouad Sedky

The following article discuss how fast tracking can lead to project delays, showing the most common risk and pitfalls when applying the technique. It will focus on examples from some projects in Qatar.

The Four Windows: Turning Opportunity into Innovation in Megaprojects

by Ian Whittingham, PMP

Apart from the size of their budgets and the reach of their ambition, one defining characteristic of megaprojects is their desire to create enduring legacies. Crossrail--the United Kingdom’s largest infrastructure project--hopes it will have an even greater impact in the field of innovation.

The Importance of Project Management in the Real Estate Sector

by Eduardo Elias

No matter how well a person or company is vertically entrenched in their specific field, most lack consistent knowledge and experience across the board in all aspects of the real estate industry. That is why best practices for project, program and portfolio management are the perfect cornerstone to support successful operations.

Ticket To Ride

by PM Network Staff

Each morning, about 90,000 passengers pass through Victoria Tube Station, one of the busiest yet smallest train stations in London, England. Infrastructure projects spanning more than 10 years and £700 million have helped, But transit sector experts warn more projects are sorely needed—and fast.

Topic Teasers Vol. 124: But Agile Won’t Work for Me!

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: With all due respect to my IT co-workers, agile may be the greatest thing since sliced bread for them, but it won’t work for me and my team. We are doing large infrastructure projects for a major city, and we can’t be assembling a small team of five to seven people to chat each morning before we decide what to do that day. But I will admit that we do need some help since few, if any, of our projects finish as planned regarding time. Also, the budgets are just a joke, because I don’t know if we’ve ever completed our work anyplace close to the estimated costs. So, make agile fix that!

Topic Teasers Vol. 26: Agile Construction

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: I work in the construction industry and am under some pressure from management to make my projects “more agile”. It makes no sense to me that IT processes would be of any use when building actual residences, industrial sites and office buildings. What am I missing?
A. You are correct is thinking that building a tangible construction is very different than creating a software application that is only electronic bits. The methodologies for each are at odds with each other.
B. If you change the wording, such as “customer demos” to “site inspections” and “constant quality testing” to “meeting technical requirements”, you will find that SCRUM, TDD and other IT methodologies can be used in construction and have extensive training available to you.
C. It is a mistake to believe that agile IT practices are the entirety of what the methodology has to offer. If you investigate the true methodology, you will find there is much to blend with your current processes to add to construction project success.
D. You can use part of the agile philosophy in your construction projects, but plan for extra time and cost to accommodate the changes the customer is now entitled to add as you go.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Topic Teasers Vol. 93: Making Historic Errors

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: Our school district has decided to raze and rebuild a historic elementary school located on an equally historic access road that was part of the first state highway. Unfortunately, in replacing a sewer line that crossed the road, about 10 feet of the original brick pattern was not reinstalled correctly. Local traffic was rerouted temporarily while the work was done, to the vocal displeasure of the nearby residents (since this three-block access road also funnels traffic from the subdivisions to the main street). What do I do about the pattern at this point?
A. When working with historic venues, leaving the site looking exactly as you found it is of extreme importance. If you don’t repair it on your own, the inspectors from your local Landmark Heritage Preservation Commission (or some similarly named organization) will ask you to redo it. So, do it now.
B. On a road that covers less than two blocks, city laws usually do not require historic artifacts and sites to be preserved. Repaint the middle lines and hope that drivers do not notice. This is preferable to stopping traffic again to redo the brickwork.
C. Ask the product owner what he or she would prefer you do. Since you were not specifically told to reinstall the roadway with exactly the same pattern, it is not your responsibility. If asked to redo it, charge extra for the expenses you incur with your subcontractors.
D. Construction projects never really come out exactly as envisioned in the beginning. Function is what is important, not beauty. If the road is safe and usable to transport students to the school and as an artery for people to enter and exit their neighborhood streets, you have fulfilled your technical and functional responsibilities.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENTS

"If you havenÆt got anything nice to say about anybody, come sit next to me."

- Alice Roosevelt Longworth