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96 items found

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5 Ways Product Teams Can Adapt To Remote Work

by Malte Scholz

In a world where social distancing has become the new normal, product teams are learning how to stay efficient despite an almost instantaneous shift to remote working. But what impact has this shift to remote working had on product teams? And what tactics should we be adopting?

Teamwork: Always the Most Important Requirement

by Andy Jordan

One of the misconceptions a lot of new project managers have is the idea that teamwork is something that is only required some of the time. That’s not real teamwork. We must learn to create the environment and let the work happen.

Topic Teasers Vol. 139: Agile Hacks for Remote Workers

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: Unfortunately, we were just starting a new agile team process as circumstances forced us to begin working from home rather than in the office. Since one of agile’s important principles is working as a small, collaborative team, this makes it difficult for us. How can we continue to get the best value for our company by working together even though we are no longer collocated?

The Most Important Thing a Leader Can Do? Nothing

by Andy Jordan

There is still a tendency to equate success with "hard work," and "hard work" with long hours. But one of the most important things we have to learn to become effective leaders is when the time has come to do nothing.

The Rigors of Restructuring: Lessons in Leadership

by Georghios Paraskeva

When a company and its PMO was divided in two, this practitioner learned a lot about teamwork, talent management and leadership as he tried to steer the projects—and the organization—to success.

Are You Choosing Your Way of Working?

by Andy Jordan

As more organizations recognize (and research confirms) the high-performance benefits of empowering project teams, how do we balance the general value of standardized agile approaches with the greater need for teams to choose their ways of working?

Distributed PM: Communication

by Bart Gerardi

Communication with a co-located team, or a team that is able to meet in person, is difficult enough. Communicating with a distributed team is even more of a challenge. Here is some advice for making it work for everyone involved.

Tips to Keep Conference Calls Short and Effective

by Michael Huber

As leaders in project management, we must take initiative to implement new best practices for our projects. Effective use of conference calls is one of the simplest yet most overlooked ways we can actively lead and improve efficiencies on our projects.

Respect: What Role Does It Play On Your Project?

by Karine O'Donnell

One of the biggest differentiators between a successful project and a failing one is the amount of respect present. This is relevant to anyone associated with the project—in any role, and at any time. Does your project exhibit these four types of respect?

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