Project Management

CANCELED: From the Triple Constraint to the Triple Bottom Line: Sustainable Project Management

January 24, 2020 1:00 PM EST (UTC-5)

Platform: WebEx
Capacity: 2000
Duration: 60 min
Presenters: Kate Milani, Fred Ulmer, Charles Nemer, Nila Vaishnav


Support: Earning PDUs | Tips For Attendees

*The mobile experience for this live webinar is not currently supported. We apologize for any inconvenience.*

Can you adopt sustainable project management practices while adding value?  Can one Project Manager make a difference? The answers are Yes.

Sustainable project practices are about more than “being green”.  Sustainability requires that we look beyond the scope, schedule, and budget of the temporary project and consider the larger “Triple Bottom Line” that projects operate within. The triple bottom line evaluates performance in a broader perspective considering economic, ecological, and social impacts otherwise known as the 3Ps - Profit, Planet, People. As the agents of change in organizations, Project Managers, are uniquely positioned to identify and lead the change that impacts your “Triple Bottom Line” while creating greater business value.                                          

​Using today’s linear economic model we take finite resources, create products and then dispose of them.  This "take, make, dispose" linear model is no longer sustainable. Learn how you as a Project Manager can shift towards the circular economy model where we “make, use, reuse, remake, and recycle”. 

​Upon completion of this session, you will be able to:  

·         Describe sustainability and the “Triple Bottom Line”.

·         Compare the linear and circular economic models. 

·         Explain circularity to stakeholders.

·         Analyze projects in the context of the circularity.


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