Project Management

Test-Driven-or-Test-First-Development

last edited by: Derek Huether on Mar 27, 2013 5:50 PM login/register to edit this page

Contents
1 Overview
2 Importance
3 PMI-ACP Exam Outline Reference
4 Body
         4.0.1 Add a test
         4.0.2 Run all tests and see if the new one fails
         4.0.3 Write some code
         4.0.4 Refactor code
         4.0.5 Repeat
5 History
6 Current practice
7 See also
8 Sources & Reference
9 External Links

Test-driven development (TDD) is a software development process that relies on the repetition of a very short development cycle: first the developer writes an (initially failing) automated test case that defines a desired improvement or new function, then produces the minimum amount of code to pass that test, and finally refactors the new code to acceptable standards. Kent Beck, who is credited with having developed or 'rediscovered' the technique, stated in 2003 that TDD encourages simple designs and inspires confidence.

Overview


Importance


PMI-ACP Exam Outline Reference

Community Guide of the PMI-ACP >Problem Detection and resolution

Body

right

Add a test

In test-driven development, each new feature begins with writing a test. This test must inevitably fail because it is written before the feature has been implemented. (If it does not fail, then either the proposed "new" feature already exists or the test is defective.) To write a test, the developer must clearly understand the feature's specification and requirements. The developer can accomplish this through use cases and user stories to cover the requirements and exception conditions, and can write the test in whatever testing framework is appropriate to the software environment. This could also be a modification of an existing test. This is a differentiating feature of test-driven development versus writing unit tests after the code is written: it makes the developer focus on the requirements before writing the code, a subtle but important difference.

Run all tests and see if the new one fails

This validates that the test harness is working correctly and that the new test does not mistakenly pass without requiring any new code. This step also tests the test itself, in the negative: it rules out the possibility that the new test always passes, and therefore is worthless. The new test should also fail for the expected reason. This increases confidence (though does not guarantee) that it is testing the right thing, and passes only in intended cases.

Write some code

The next step is to write some code that causes the test to pass. The new code written at this stage is not perfect, and may, for example, pass the test in an inelegant way. That is acceptable because later steps improve and hone it. It is important that the code written is only designed to pass the test; no further (and therefore untested) functionality should be predicted and 'allowed for' at any stage. editRun the automated tests and see them succeed If all test cases now pass, the programmer can be confident that the code meets all the tested requirements. This is a good point from which to begin the final step of the cycle.

Refactor code

Now the code can be cleaned up as necessary. By re-running the test cases, the developer can be confident that code refactoring is not damaging any existing functionality. The concept of removing duplication is an important aspect of any software design. In this case, however, it also applies to removing any duplication between the test code and the production codeā€”for example magic numbers or strings repeated in both to make the test pass in step 3.

Repeat

Starting with another new test, the cycle is then repeated to push forward the functionality. The size of the steps should always be small, with as few as 1 to 10 edits between each test run. If new code does not rapidly satisfy a new test, or other tests fail unexpectedly, the programmer should undo or revert in preference to excessive debugging. Continuous integration helps by providing revertible checkpoints. When using external libraries it is important not to make increments that are so small as to be effectively merely testing the library itself,3 unless there is some reason to believe that the library is buggy or is not sufficiently feature-complete to serve all the needs of the main program being written.

History

Test-driven development is related to the test-first programming concepts of Programming, begun in 1999,but more recently has created more general interest in its own right. Programmers also apply the concept to improving and debugging legacy code developed with older techniques. (1)

Current practice


See also


Experience Report - Agile with Formal Reqts and Test Case Mgmt

Sources & Reference


External Links


(1)Wikipedia - TDD


last edited by: Derek Huether on Mar 27, 2013 5:50 PM login/register to edit this page


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