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Topics: Change Management, Integration Management
Why "Approved change requests" are not inputs of Scope and Schedule Control ?
Network:28



Hello,

I hope this question is not too basic. I'm still studying the PMBOK.

But as for now, I still can't understand why the "Approved change requests" are not inputs of Scope and Schedule Control ?

In fact, I'm not quite sure also if the update to documents related to the "approved change requests" are performed inside "Perform integrated change control" or Control Scope or Control Schedule.

Thanks for your answers :)

Alexandre
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Network:2421



Change requests are approved for implementation. Hence approved CRs are input to the Execution process groups and more specifically the direct and manage project work process for implementation.

Once implemented, they (and their results) are input the control quality process, which in turn feeds into the monitor and control project work process.
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1 reply by Michael Delaney
Apr 22, 2019 10:38 AM
Michael Delaney
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Nice explanation Thomas
Network:2421



As part of the process of approving CRs, schedule and cost baseline may be changed, which are input to the respective control processes.
Network:28



Thank you Thomas !

But this gets more confusing in my head.

In the book "Head First PMP" I read that the goal of "Control scope" is to turn approved changes into document updates.

So I understand that I need to get the "approved version" of the change request inside the "Control Scope" to changed the related documents.

And I also expect that the baseline is modified BEFORE implementation. Isn't it ?

Alexandre
Network:1883



Take a look to Quality. Control Quality is about to take the deliverable and validate it conforms the requirements and approved change request has been implemented. Control Quality is performed on each projece deliverable. Taking your question, Control Scope or Control Schedule is about to take scope/schedule, take work performance data, and see any deviation. If deviation is in place a change request has to be rised. If a change is rised it has to be put under approval consideration performing Integrated Change Control. If the change has been approved it will be implemented performing Direct and Manage Project Work.
Network:28



Thank you Sergio.

So does it mean that if I detect a scope change that needs to be done in "Control Scope", the update of the related documents once the change is approved is not done in the "Control Scope" process ?

Alexandre
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1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Apr 21, 2019 8:35 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
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You will not do anything in Control Scope except to compare work performance data with scope baseline and detecting deviations. If a deviation is detected then a change request must be rised (see Control Scope outputs). See figure 5-18 and you will see that rised change request "goes to" Integrated Change Control because is the place where it will be approved or not. When the change request is approved then the change is implemented (related documents are changed) inside Direct and Managed Project Work where you will have defined all the activities needed to perform the changes. In Control Scope you do nothing except to chech work performance data with scope baseline to create change request related to scope. When those change request are approved then related documents are modified inside Direct and Manage Project Work.
Network:2421



Alexandre, I would argue that any potential scope change has to be analyzed before approval. A key tool for this is the requirements traceability matrix (see PMBoK page 148 bottom). From there, all(!) planning processes might be triggered. If this revised plan is presented to the CCB, they have all the information to approve or not. Only then, CR implementation is triggered.

Control (scope) is not involved, other than the baselines and other planning documents might have changed.

The changed baselines are prepared with the planning before approval and implemented after approval.

This is a great example how agile and flexible the PMBoK processes are.

And, regarding the change, it might be necessary to change the business case, which is almost never done in practice though and reason for many project failures. Business case changes are not in scope of the project manager.
Network:28



Thank you Thomas.

But while you are preparing changes to all these planning documents, they are still not commited in the system right ?

These are just temporary documents sent to the change control board, until change is approved right ?

Because if the change was applied on these documents, and the change is not approved, then we would have to undo all these changes...

So I guess my question was rather when the changes are commited to the system.
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1 reply by Thomas Walenta
Apr 21, 2019 8:57 AM
Thomas Walenta
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The term committed to system is ambiguous. It includes approving the change, implementing it and confirming implementation (control quality).
Network:1883



Apr 21, 2019 7:46 AM
Replying to Alexandre Filipiak
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Thank you Sergio.

So does it mean that if I detect a scope change that needs to be done in "Control Scope", the update of the related documents once the change is approved is not done in the "Control Scope" process ?

Alexandre
You will not do anything in Control Scope except to compare work performance data with scope baseline and detecting deviations. If a deviation is detected then a change request must be rised (see Control Scope outputs). See figure 5-18 and you will see that rised change request "goes to" Integrated Change Control because is the place where it will be approved or not. When the change request is approved then the change is implemented (related documents are changed) inside Direct and Managed Project Work where you will have defined all the activities needed to perform the changes. In Control Scope you do nothing except to chech work performance data with scope baseline to create change request related to scope. When those change request are approved then related documents are modified inside Direct and Manage Project Work.
Network:2421



Apr 21, 2019 8:02 AM
Replying to Alexandre Filipiak
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Thank you Thomas.

But while you are preparing changes to all these planning documents, they are still not commited in the system right ?

These are just temporary documents sent to the change control board, until change is approved right ?

Because if the change was applied on these documents, and the change is not approved, then we would have to undo all these changes...

So I guess my question was rather when the changes are commited to the system.
The term committed to system is ambiguous. It includes approving the change, implementing it and confirming implementation (control quality).
Network:28



Thanks for your anwsers !

@Sergio : why then do we have scope baseline / schedule baseline and cost baseline as an output of "Control Scope" ? Are they not changed by the "Control Scope" process ?

@Thomas : so do you mean that when the team receives the approved changes in the process "Direct and Manage work", the approved changes are not yet modified in the baseline included in the project management plan ?
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2 replies by Sergio Luis Conte and Thomas Walenta
Apr 21, 2019 10:53 AM
Thomas Walenta
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Alexandre,
do not see that PMBoK gives a sequence, updating the baselines could be done in parallel to actually implementing the changes. Some projects update plans in a fixed rhythm, like agile sprints at the start of each sprint, while a change might be time-sensitive and has to be implemented immediately.
Apr 22, 2019 7:23 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
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Now you are pointed out other thing. Your orginal question was about change request. Change request are not processing in control scope except for creating a change request if it applies after you perform control scope. For other things than processing (implement) a chante request impacted baselines are updated.
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