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Topics: Career Development, New Practitioners
PMP Application Hour Calculation
Network:6



I am currently trying to calculate my hour into the PMP applicaiton.
My issue is that I have worked a few large projects combined with multiple small projects at the same time. We're always running 3-5 projects per person.
How do I calculate the overlapping HOURS for all of those projects? I'm struggling to find a tool that will show me if I go "OVER" hours for a certain time frame and manually calculating these is making my brain hurt.
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Network:102098



I hear you, Hannah. I've had to do the same thing when I applied for each of my certifications. My suggestion is to do it in a spreadsheet and use rules of thumb.

Build the month timeline for all your projects so you can clearly see the overlaps. (Don't go finer than month unless you really want to pull your hair out.) Assign a percentage of your time for each project. You will then also assign a percentage of time to split each project's time by the knowledge areas.

Once you have completed your calculations, do a sanity check with whomever you would use to verify your claim, should you be audited.

Just build it up, one step at a time, and you will get there.
...
1 reply by Hannah Scarbro
Aug 19, 2019 11:01 AM
Hannah Scarbro
...
Thanks. That's very helpful. I did the percentage tricks you explained and that helped a lot to compare those to hours available per month. I did notice a few areas where I seemed to have over estimated just because you cant accurately explain through percentages when you're working on a long term project with smaller projects and fluctuating priorities so I was able to more accurately portray the project hours for that one project by splitting it into two phases over different time periods, design and implementation since they happened in two project cycles..
Network:869



Separate the ideas of months on projects and hours of experience. Think of it like duration and effort. You need at least 36 months unique non-overlapping experience, and within that 36 months+ you need at least 4,500 hours leading and directing projects.

They say non-overlapping hours because they don't want you to count, for example, two projects worked in the same 3 month period as 6 months of experience.

I used a spreadsheet to tally each project's hours separately, and then total them at the end. The application helped with verifying the non-overlapping months, but you can do this on a spreadsheet or Visio, as well. There is probably an easier way, but you can create a roadmap or swimlane of your projects and show the duration for each project. If your cumulative projects span at least 36 months, you should be okay. You just can't count the same month twice.

Does this make sense?
Network:701



Hi Hannah,

One thing you may consider is looking at the total number of hours worked over the last three years on projects (i.e. 50 weeks x 40 hours = 2000 hours/year). Then you can divide the 2000 by # of projects/year (i.e. 2000/5 = 400 hours on each project). From there you can look at how much time you spent on each project for each of the phases (i.e. initiation, planning, executing/monitoring, closing).

This is a reasonable estimation if you don't have good records on the actual activities performed.
Network:472



I agree with Aaron and Stephane. I used excel and documented all my projects. Then I went monthly and assigned the percentages I worked on them. I knew my hours at that time and calculated from there, how many hours I worked. It does not have to be an exact match of "literal" hours, but this will help you get pretty close!
Network:321



Hannah,
I would do as Jon says, but if you are full time as a PM, use 2000 hrs/year but multiply by 0.8 because about 80% (1600) is about as much as people can spend assigned when dedicated to their project(s). The other time is the administrative stuff like team meetings, performance reviews with your manager, etc. That's a pretty standard efficiency factor.

If you have a couple big projects and some smaller ones, I generally assume about 40 to 60% of my time is on the big projects, with the rest divided between the small ones. How you divide the time up between phases is pretty arbitrary. Sometimes you can plan them well and they're easy to manage. Sometimes problems come up and you spend all your time in the execution or closure phases.

You can divide it up with various proportions like front loaded, level loaded, etc. but getting more precise than that is a waste of time. Nobody is going to audit your actual charging.
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1 reply by Hannah Scarbro
Aug 19, 2019 11:06 AM
Hannah Scarbro
...
This definitely helped. I was already calculating percentages spent on projects in an excel so I just had to take it that step further and compare based on spending about 80% of time per month. Good suggestions! Thanks
Network:124212



Hannah,

The PMO handbook (Page 8) gives you tips how to calculate overlapping project hours. Check it out:

https://www.pmi.org/-/media/pmi/documents/...al-handbook.pdf

To calculate hours, I used excel sheet, total hours, percentage per domain that I believe reflect how I divided my hours in the projects and then everything will calculate itself out.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,
RK
Network:1880



My recoomendation is following which @Rami stated above and just in case you still have doubts contact PMI´s Cutomer Care. Just to comment overlaping counts like one project. I meat if you worked in two simultaneous project it counts like one.
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1 reply by Hannah Scarbro
Aug 19, 2019 11:05 AM
Hannah Scarbro
...
I think from my research that this is not true. the projects can be claimed separately but the months cannot be counted separately. Ex. I cant claim more hours in the month but I can claim for hours on all the projects I spent that month even if they run simultaneously. Its easy not to do such because the application will only count the months once thankfully so I dont have to worry about only listing them once. But it does let you claim the hours.
Network:210



If you are spending days working on this, you're making it harder than it needs to be.

I knew people who spent weeks on the application. From their experiences it seemed unnecessarily difficult.

After I gathered my information, it took 10 minutes to complete the application. I was guided by a man who worked with PMI and knew what they look for. if you are taking, or have taken a course, ask the instructor for help. It's not as difficult as it seems.
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1 reply by Hannah Scarbro
Aug 19, 2019 11:02 AM
Hannah Scarbro
...
It would take me more than 10 minutes to even enter my projects into the site much less gather all the info. Maybe if you're working on a few large projects over the course of 3 years but not when you have 3-4 projects at a time..
Network:23

So you are experienced in PM but try to calculate hrs in years of experience. Example:- 40 hrs. a week and 40*4=160 hrs. in a Month and so on.
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1 reply by Hannah Scarbro
Aug 19, 2019 11:01 AM
Hannah Scarbro
...
This was helpful. I calculated hours per month as you suggested and compared per month what i was claiming.
Network:6



Aug 16, 2019 10:02 AM
Replying to Stéphane Parent
...
I hear you, Hannah. I've had to do the same thing when I applied for each of my certifications. My suggestion is to do it in a spreadsheet and use rules of thumb.

Build the month timeline for all your projects so you can clearly see the overlaps. (Don't go finer than month unless you really want to pull your hair out.) Assign a percentage of your time for each project. You will then also assign a percentage of time to split each project's time by the knowledge areas.

Once you have completed your calculations, do a sanity check with whomever you would use to verify your claim, should you be audited.

Just build it up, one step at a time, and you will get there.
Thanks. That's very helpful. I did the percentage tricks you explained and that helped a lot to compare those to hours available per month. I did notice a few areas where I seemed to have over estimated just because you cant accurately explain through percentages when you're working on a long term project with smaller projects and fluctuating priorities so I was able to more accurately portray the project hours for that one project by splitting it into two phases over different time periods, design and implementation since they happened in two project cycles..
...
1 reply by Stéphane Parent
Aug 19, 2019 12:36 PM
Stéphane Parent
...
I'm glad you were able to work it through. It sounds like you did a bit of problem solving along the way.

We'll be happy to support you during your preparation and study.
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