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Topics: Career Development
What is the role of a Senior Project Analyst?
I am new to my position as a Senior Project Analyst. It is also a brand new role within my organization. I am looking for informal feedback.

What do you think a successful Senior Project Analyst looks like?
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I will be totally obvious but I will take the risk. If I would be in your situation I will ask to my company "which is what the company expect from the role?". After I getting the answer this will be my focus no matter I will take the answer and make a bechmark. But at the end, is what your company expect. That´s the only thin that matters to decide the strategy to follow.
Angela -

A PA role is usually supporting one or more PMs by taking over the project administration burden from them. PAs also act as the right-hand person for the PM, being able to step in at a moment's notice if the PM is unavailable.

I've seen some PAs who are quite capable of managing small-medium sized projects but want the experience and mentoring from a very senior PM by supporting them on a large, complex program or project.

A successful PA will remove as much of the administrative burden as possible from the PM they are supporting AND will be a trusted advisor for the PM to help them make the best possible decisions. They will be very comfortable crunching numbers and mining through data to enable the PM through effective decision support.

Kiron
Are you part of a PMO? In addition to what @Kiron mentioned, I've also seen this role take on administrative functions in a PMO, such as PPM data management and reporting at the Program and Portfolio level.
Hi Angela - it would be interesting to see the actual job description from your organization to compare our assumptions.

A Project Analyst is essentially the right-hand for the Project Manager; Data Analysis, Communications, Monitoring & Tracking paperwork, budget tracking, forecasting, etc.

Any senior role would have an expectation to offer a level of subject matter expertise and be seen as the 'go-to' person for guidance, advice, or mentorship.
Angela
Agree with Andrew ( to compare JD ) as it related to Bank field.
BR,
Hello Angela,

Thanks for asking this question as I was also wondering the same thing. It sounds like Kiron had the best answer for you, but Sergio bring s up a good point. You should check to see what your employer expects from you. If possible, have them give you a list of your job duties so you have something to refer to.

All the best!
Angela

My colleagues here have some great feedback. Being a new roles / post, I suggest you check the Job Function Description which will help you determine what are your duties and responsibilities (Which I am sure you are aware of).

If you can provide us with a brief of your JD, we will be able to advice better, in my humble opinion.

RK
I agree with Sergio. What is the expectation/s from your organization? People (HR) are famous for dreaming up all sorts of weird and wonderful titles that might or might not align with the 'standard' definition. HR should be able to tell you against what your performance will be measured and THIS will be your definition of a good PM analyst.
Thank you all for your comments. This is helpful insight.
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1 reply by Justus N
Mar 09, 2020 9:53 AM
Justus N
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GM Angela,

First, congratulations on the new gig/role! I agree with the above responses, once you check your own internal descriptions, I recommend checking competitor companies or companies in the small field to see what their descriptors are for the same role.
Mar 09, 2020 8:35 AM
Replying to Angela Goodrige
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Thank you all for your comments. This is helpful insight.
GM Angela,

First, congratulations on the new gig/role! I agree with the above responses, once you check your own internal descriptions, I recommend checking competitor companies or companies in the small field to see what their descriptors are for the same role.
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