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Hybrid Manifesto - Does it exist?
The Hybrid Manifesto is triggered by my thoughts about the right attitude, values and spirit for successful adoption and excellence of Hybrid project management. I believe, a universally accepted hybrid project manifesto will help project management practitioners to adopt hybrid in the right spirit, than debating endlessly on which project management framework is better.

The Hybrid Manifesto - My version

As practitioners of Hybrid Project Management, We believe that;

All projects are unique in nature.
Tailoring the processes to be followed in the project, by incorporating the best from every project management framework is better than aligning with any one framework.

For this;
We will continuously update our knowledge and skills without any bias to any one particular school of thought.
We will always maintain a non-aligned open view in all our actions.

Is there anything similar already existing?.

Universally accepted Hybrid Project Management manifesto promoted by reputed organizations like PMI, will help principle centered adoption of hybrid. What is your take on this?
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When I see "agile purists" I read it as "people who missed the point". Agile is a set of principles not procedures. Nevertheless, I see some self-proclaimed agile experts, or people who just came back wide eyed from a multi-day seminar who declare that everything must be done a certain way for success.

I call that "Rigid Agile". Trainers and consultants have a vested interest in selling their methods as The Best Way, as that branding is their selling point. People who come back from a seminar and immediately declare that we must knock down all the walls and reorganize the entire business, missed the underlying principles of agile and are preaching dogma.

Principle #12: Regular Reflection and Adjustment

Inherent in that principle is that there is no one right way, or if their is for our current projects, we must continuously rethink our way of working to seek that lofty goal.
Thank You Keith Novak for your views. I fully agree with your views. The root cause is none of the agile enthusiasts have taken pains to understand predictive project management frameworks and vice-versa. Projects are unique, and they must succeed, that is the top priority.
Good reply, Keith. I feel the same.

There is no benefit in having another belief system, which a manifesto would be ('I believe ..'). It would create another sect, the priests trying to divide the community by looking at non-believers as enemies and the pamphlets stating deductions from beliefs rather from facts.

Beliefs divide, values unite (and no, it is not enough to relabel beliefs as values).
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1 reply by Abrachan Pudussery
Oct 01, 2020 11:42 AM
Abrachan Pudussery
...
Thank you Thomas for your views. The Agile manifesto and the 12 agile principles definitely had a positive impact on me. I never felt it as divisive. Divisions are made by practitioners with their vested interests or with their resistance to come out of their comfort zones and experiment new things. I fully appreciate your views.
Oct 01, 2020 11:33 AM
Replying to Thomas Walenta
...
Good reply, Keith. I feel the same.

There is no benefit in having another belief system, which a manifesto would be ('I believe ..'). It would create another sect, the priests trying to divide the community by looking at non-believers as enemies and the pamphlets stating deductions from beliefs rather from facts.

Beliefs divide, values unite (and no, it is not enough to relabel beliefs as values).
Thank you Thomas for your views. The Agile manifesto and the 12 agile principles definitely had a positive impact on me. I never felt it as divisive. Divisions are made by practitioners with their vested interests or with their resistance to come out of their comfort zones and experiment new things. I fully appreciate your views.
...
1 reply by Thomas Walenta
Oct 01, 2020 1:27 PM
Thomas Walenta
...
Hi Abrachan,

members of all sects are happy and think there is a positive impact on them. All sects are divisive (vs other sects), without maybe the members noticing. We would not see so many pamphlets on waterfall vs agile otherwise.

I like your insight 'do whatever is required'. We all have our biases and experience, but we only can be successful in life if we can switch perspectives and mental models.

I like Peter's headline 'there is no hybrid'.

Working on an article titled 'If agile is predictive, and waterfall is flexible, is hybrid a hoax?'.

Who benefits from a mental model putting agile and waterfall as opposites? Not the world. All models are wrong, some are helpful. For whom?

Good discussion, thank you for starting it.
While I may not be adding anything new to the discussion, I agree, so far. I don't think we need to codify every exception to the core principles in the agile manifesto, or we risk ending up with as many manifestos as frameworks/methodologies (and certifications). Why add to the confusion, unless there is something specific and huge that the agile manifesto misses.
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2 replies by Abrachan Pudussery
Oct 01, 2020 12:18 PM
Abrachan Pudussery
...
Thank you Aaron
Oct 01, 2020 12:37 PM
Abrachan Pudussery
...
Afterthought. While agile manifesto and principles are tailored to software development, I had to tailor it to explain agility to other disciplines of project management especially EPC projects. Given the fact that hybrid will have larger audience outside software, it may be worthwhile to define one for hybrid.
Oct 01, 2020 12:11 PM
Replying to Aaron Porter
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While I may not be adding anything new to the discussion, I agree, so far. I don't think we need to codify every exception to the core principles in the agile manifesto, or we risk ending up with as many manifestos as frameworks/methodologies (and certifications). Why add to the confusion, unless there is something specific and huge that the agile manifesto misses.
Thank you Aaron
Oct 01, 2020 12:11 PM
Replying to Aaron Porter
...
While I may not be adding anything new to the discussion, I agree, so far. I don't think we need to codify every exception to the core principles in the agile manifesto, or we risk ending up with as many manifestos as frameworks/methodologies (and certifications). Why add to the confusion, unless there is something specific and huge that the agile manifesto misses.
Afterthought. While agile manifesto and principles are tailored to software development, I had to tailor it to explain agility to other disciplines of project management especially EPC projects. Given the fact that hybrid will have larger audience outside software, it may be worthwhile to define one for hybrid.
...
1 reply by Aaron Porter
Oct 02, 2020 10:56 AM
Aaron Porter
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As a project manager, I prefer to adapt a tool to a new purpose, instead of creating a new tool, when it makes sense to do so. The agile manifesto can be adapted, fairly easily, for non-software product development.

As a little bit of a cynic, I hear "new manifesto for use outside of software development" and I think "new certifications and money-making opportunities for certification providers." If you want to go down this path, find a niche. There are already several approaches for scaling agile across an organization, which goes beyond software development. Then there is business agility. It's not the same thing as agile, and is not an easy market to break into.

You could probably come up with a non-software hybrid manifesto, blog about it, write a book, and speak at PM conferences to build a name for yourself. It might not be industry changing, but it could eventually lead to some interesting contract engagements.
There is no 'Hybrid'. There numerous tools to assist with delivery of a project for you to choose from to suit the project and the culture of those delivering the project.

The ultimate project management methodology is Risk Driven Project Management. One does what one needs to do to identify and manage threats (T) and opportunity. (O)

Identify the events and take action to mitigate threats (risks) and enhance opportunity including assigning a PM and setting up a PMO, selecting a best process - or not - as the T and O analysis dictates.

Keep in mind the only reason we manage a project (or anything for that matter) is to deal with risk and opportunity.

If you are spending effort other than dealing with T and O you are wasting time and money. (note: before someone falls off their chair, administration including reporting is a component of T and O management)

PMI has it wrong - risk management is not a component of project management, its clearly the other way around.

Just saying ;-)
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1 reply by Abrachan Pudussery
Oct 01, 2020 1:02 PM
Abrachan Pudussery
...
Thank you Peter for your perspective. Whatever can go wrong will go wrong, and you manage them proactively. For that do whatever is required.
Oct 01, 2020 12:49 PM
Replying to Peter Rapin
...
There is no 'Hybrid'. There numerous tools to assist with delivery of a project for you to choose from to suit the project and the culture of those delivering the project.

The ultimate project management methodology is Risk Driven Project Management. One does what one needs to do to identify and manage threats (T) and opportunity. (O)

Identify the events and take action to mitigate threats (risks) and enhance opportunity including assigning a PM and setting up a PMO, selecting a best process - or not - as the T and O analysis dictates.

Keep in mind the only reason we manage a project (or anything for that matter) is to deal with risk and opportunity.

If you are spending effort other than dealing with T and O you are wasting time and money. (note: before someone falls off their chair, administration including reporting is a component of T and O management)

PMI has it wrong - risk management is not a component of project management, its clearly the other way around.

Just saying ;-)
Thank you Peter for your perspective. Whatever can go wrong will go wrong, and you manage them proactively. For that do whatever is required.
Oct 01, 2020 11:42 AM
Replying to Abrachan Pudussery
...
Thank you Thomas for your views. The Agile manifesto and the 12 agile principles definitely had a positive impact on me. I never felt it as divisive. Divisions are made by practitioners with their vested interests or with their resistance to come out of their comfort zones and experiment new things. I fully appreciate your views.
Hi Abrachan,

members of all sects are happy and think there is a positive impact on them. All sects are divisive (vs other sects), without maybe the members noticing. We would not see so many pamphlets on waterfall vs agile otherwise.

I like your insight 'do whatever is required'. We all have our biases and experience, but we only can be successful in life if we can switch perspectives and mental models.

I like Peter's headline 'there is no hybrid'.

Working on an article titled 'If agile is predictive, and waterfall is flexible, is hybrid a hoax?'.

Who benefits from a mental model putting agile and waterfall as opposites? Not the world. All models are wrong, some are helpful. For whom?

Good discussion, thank you for starting it.
...
1 reply by Abrachan Pudussery
Oct 01, 2020 1:53 PM
Abrachan Pudussery
...
Thank you Thomas. I started using the term agile and waterfall instead of agile vs waterfall very early. Now iam working on an article about the application of agile within large infrastructure projects :-)
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