Project Management

Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Topics: Construction
Agile for building constructions
Could someone mention some example of the use of agile "approaches" in construction (not in design or engineering but in the construction phase). Is any modern building using this? Modern buildings
thanks in advance
Sort By:
Page: 1 2 next>
Nohely -

If you drop "methodologies" and replace it with "approaches", then there is more likelihood of usage as most agile methodologies were positioned at building software or systems.

There have been attempts to use frameworks such as Scrum (see https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/arti...77705816339601) but adaptation is required to address the differences between building software and constructing buildings.

Kiron
...
1 reply by NOHELY COLINA
Nov 30, 2021 8:32 AM
NOHELY COLINA
...
Yes, absolutely agree, my question is about approaches
I am not a construction expert by any means, but I have bench-marked some agile practices in heavy industry with similar obstacles. One theme that stands out is that in construction, you must re-think how the principles are applied, and it may not be effective depending on what you're building.

Although the time scales are very different, progressive delivery of functionality may be used if it is designed into the architecture. Two examples are 1) design for late stage customization, and 2) design for expansion. Both can enable incremental and iterative build, with functionality growing and evolving over time based on customer need.

Design for late stage customization might be a large open structure where the volume can be divided up later. An example would be an office building which opens at partial occupancy and the floor plans can be figured out later. Certain key limitations exist like major utility locations and load bearing structure, but other things like electrical and ethernet can be hidden in accessible raceways and framing can go wherever. By the time some floors are leased, others may have already been reconfigured for new tenants.

Design for expansion is a modular approach. If you built a moon colony, you would start with basic facilities, then add more buildings, and connect them to form a campus. It's the same concept as light rail construction with potential for future expansion. The expandability must be designed in though, or it may be difficult if not impossible later.

Both of those approaches add cost for future capability you may never need.

It is not really new concept, but the architecture needs to consider the future expansion. A civil engineer once explained to me how buildings in Cairo were often built with the rebar protruding from the top floor so they could add more floors later. If too many were added, they tended to collapse. It is difficult (and in that case dangerous) to expand capabilities beyond some initial design constraints.
...
1 reply by NOHELY COLINA
Nov 30, 2021 8:53 AM
NOHELY COLINA
...
Keith, Yeah that's right. the incremental is easy for me to understand in constructions by stages and in longer time scales with continuity to future stages. We would have an incremental approach. I agree.
For Agility, where we focus on innovation, where change drives I have not been able to get a real example that is applied during the construction phase.
I like the example. For a colony on the moon, I think that there would come the experimental in live construction. Agility at 100%.

Nowdays,for our reality, I believe that the contracts establishing the time and the cost and transforms it to predictive by having all the requirements defined in advance.
Thank you Kevin, very specific that example.
In Construction, we use a Hybrid Approach: Agile during design then waterfall during construction. It's almost impossible to use Agile approach during construction phase as there are lots of constraints but of course we use Lean in terms of waste reduction, JIT in terms of Material Purchases, and so on.
...
2 replies by NOHELY COLINA and Shobhit Agarwal
Nov 30, 2021 3:13 AM
Shobhit Agarwal
...
That's true.

Adding example : In Residential real estate, we always do iterations in terms of design. Sometimes mockups and samples are done to take stakeholder feedback. Designs are sometimes tweaked based on end-user requirement.
Nov 30, 2021 8:36 AM
NOHELY COLINA
...
Rami, It is exactly what I think but had not gotten anyone to specify it. And I think it's the right thing to do, use the agile approach to design ... difficult in construction phase

Thank, thank, and thank a lot!
Nov 30, 2021 12:53 AM
Replying to Rami Kaibni
...
In Construction, we use a Hybrid Approach: Agile during design then waterfall during construction. It's almost impossible to use Agile approach during construction phase as there are lots of constraints but of course we use Lean in terms of waste reduction, JIT in terms of Material Purchases, and so on.
That's true.

Adding example : In Residential real estate, we always do iterations in terms of design. Sometimes mockups and samples are done to take stakeholder feedback. Designs are sometimes tweaked based on end-user requirement.
...
1 reply by NOHELY COLINA
Nov 30, 2021 8:38 AM
NOHELY COLINA
...
thank you Shobhit, appreciate your help!
Nov 29, 2021 4:41 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Nohely -

If you drop "methodologies" and replace it with "approaches", then there is more likelihood of usage as most agile methodologies were positioned at building software or systems.

There have been attempts to use frameworks such as Scrum (see https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/arti...77705816339601) but adaptation is required to address the differences between building software and constructing buildings.

Kiron
Yes, absolutely agree, my question is about approaches
Nov 30, 2021 12:53 AM
Replying to Rami Kaibni
...
In Construction, we use a Hybrid Approach: Agile during design then waterfall during construction. It's almost impossible to use Agile approach during construction phase as there are lots of constraints but of course we use Lean in terms of waste reduction, JIT in terms of Material Purchases, and so on.
Rami, It is exactly what I think but had not gotten anyone to specify it. And I think it's the right thing to do, use the agile approach to design ... difficult in construction phase

Thank, thank, and thank a lot!
...
1 reply by Rami Kaibni
Nov 30, 2021 9:16 AM
Rami Kaibni
...
You’re welcome Nohely.
Nov 30, 2021 3:13 AM
Replying to Shobhit Agarwal
...
That's true.

Adding example : In Residential real estate, we always do iterations in terms of design. Sometimes mockups and samples are done to take stakeholder feedback. Designs are sometimes tweaked based on end-user requirement.
thank you Shobhit, appreciate your help!
Nov 29, 2021 8:58 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
...
I am not a construction expert by any means, but I have bench-marked some agile practices in heavy industry with similar obstacles. One theme that stands out is that in construction, you must re-think how the principles are applied, and it may not be effective depending on what you're building.

Although the time scales are very different, progressive delivery of functionality may be used if it is designed into the architecture. Two examples are 1) design for late stage customization, and 2) design for expansion. Both can enable incremental and iterative build, with functionality growing and evolving over time based on customer need.

Design for late stage customization might be a large open structure where the volume can be divided up later. An example would be an office building which opens at partial occupancy and the floor plans can be figured out later. Certain key limitations exist like major utility locations and load bearing structure, but other things like electrical and ethernet can be hidden in accessible raceways and framing can go wherever. By the time some floors are leased, others may have already been reconfigured for new tenants.

Design for expansion is a modular approach. If you built a moon colony, you would start with basic facilities, then add more buildings, and connect them to form a campus. It's the same concept as light rail construction with potential for future expansion. The expandability must be designed in though, or it may be difficult if not impossible later.

Both of those approaches add cost for future capability you may never need.

It is not really new concept, but the architecture needs to consider the future expansion. A civil engineer once explained to me how buildings in Cairo were often built with the rebar protruding from the top floor so they could add more floors later. If too many were added, they tended to collapse. It is difficult (and in that case dangerous) to expand capabilities beyond some initial design constraints.
Keith, Yeah that's right. the incremental is easy for me to understand in constructions by stages and in longer time scales with continuity to future stages. We would have an incremental approach. I agree.
For Agility, where we focus on innovation, where change drives I have not been able to get a real example that is applied during the construction phase.
I like the example. For a colony on the moon, I think that there would come the experimental in live construction. Agility at 100%.

Nowdays,for our reality, I believe that the contracts establishing the time and the cost and transforms it to predictive by having all the requirements defined in advance.
Thank you Kevin, very specific that example.
Nov 30, 2021 8:36 AM
Replying to NOHELY COLINA
...
Rami, It is exactly what I think but had not gotten anyone to specify it. And I think it's the right thing to do, use the agile approach to design ... difficult in construction phase

Thank, thank, and thank a lot!
You’re welcome Nohely.
Construction has evolved along a linear process - concept, design, procure, construct and turn over. Contracting has reinforced this approach in what's called a Design-Bid-Build (DBB) model which has been considered the most cost effective (competitive) way of delivering the objective. This approach has been questioned and modified over the last 30 years in attempts to combine DBB to improve delivery effectiveness. Many projects now follow a Design Build (DB) model, essentially holding one firm responsible for delivery through the employment of designers and sub-contractors. This approach allows for more coordination between design and building but it remains a very linear process and involves contracts which can, and do, get in the way of efficiencies and flexibility for on-the-fly changes.

A more recent approach is what is being called an Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) model where one entity is created to delivery the project - typically a partnership between all the major players (stakeholders) with shared project responsibility. The parties share risks and benefits and are motivated to deliver as effectively as possible.

This latest model, IPD, is much more conducive to an Agile approach, is not as encumbered by contractual constraints with considerable more flexibility to adjust at every stage of the delivery process. But, as mentioned before, the flexibility has to be built in.
Page: 1 2 next>  

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

"Man who waits for roast duck to fly into mouth must wait very, very long time."

- Chinese Proverb

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors