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Project Management Guild?
An article by the PM Times written by Mike Morton (2007), discusses what senior managers ask "How do I know who is a good project manager".

Read the article for a full understanding. https://www.projecttimes.com/articles/brin...oject-managers/


The article entails the prospect of a guild system which the writer describes as an ancient but revered that uses the apprentice, journeyman, and master hierarchy to gradually make sure a professional is of sufficient quality and skill to be unleashed on mankind.

The process would include setting up the Project Management Office as a center of excellence and having project managers go through an apprenticeship program before they’re given unsupervised responsibility for projects. Moreover, it is something that can be adopted in mid-size to large scale organizations.

What are yall thoughts on something such as this?
Would it be something that would be relevant and be of value to those in the project management profession?
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I would say that may or may not be helpful. Depends on how you interpret and act.
Stephen -

While not referenced in most cases as a guild, it is common practice in many companies for those new to the PM profession to start in a project analyst role where they would be supporting a seasoned PM on a moderate to large sized project. Through that experience, the project analyst gains competency and is ready to be given their own project.

Another similar model is the use of Communities of Practice where PMs across an organization of different levels get together on a regular basis to share learnings and to identify opportunities for establishing mentor-mentee relationships.

Note that neither of these approaches require a PMO. If one exists, it might get involved in helping to stand up a CoP, but this is not essential.

Kiron
...
2 replies by Kiron Bondale and Stephen Robin
Mar 24, 2022 4:17 PM
Stephen Robin
...
Solid points, as the profession has grown over the years, there are already established programs and initiatives for young professionals in the field to gain sufficient skill and experience over time. Although I may ask. Starting off as a project analyst role with the support of a seasoned PM. Is it a general practice across the board or is it region or industry-specific?

The Communities of Practice is new to me but from some research undertaken, it is a key tool in the development of newbie practitioners. Thanks for this source of information.

Moreover in the scenario where the usage of Communities of Practice is limited or non-existent on a country or regional basis. Additionally, with a low pm maturity model, would the guild system be an asset? I agree that it would not be essential but would its value rise in particular countries that have not adopted certain models and practices that you have mentioned?
Mar 25, 2022 7:37 AM
Kiron Bondale
...
Stephen -

Starting as a Project Analyst (sometimes referred to as a Project Coordinator or Project Control Officer) is a fairly common practice and is not industry-specific. It usually comes down to the scale or size of the project where the PM benefits from having a right-hand person to help with a lot of the administrative aspects of the role, but that individual also can (in a pinch) act on behalf of the PM if required.

I feel that a guild is more advanced than a Community of Practice, so if there isn't the appetite for a CoP, there's unlikely to be that for establishing a meaningful guild.

Kiron
Mar 24, 2022 11:40 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Stephen -

While not referenced in most cases as a guild, it is common practice in many companies for those new to the PM profession to start in a project analyst role where they would be supporting a seasoned PM on a moderate to large sized project. Through that experience, the project analyst gains competency and is ready to be given their own project.

Another similar model is the use of Communities of Practice where PMs across an organization of different levels get together on a regular basis to share learnings and to identify opportunities for establishing mentor-mentee relationships.

Note that neither of these approaches require a PMO. If one exists, it might get involved in helping to stand up a CoP, but this is not essential.

Kiron
Solid points, as the profession has grown over the years, there are already established programs and initiatives for young professionals in the field to gain sufficient skill and experience over time. Although I may ask. Starting off as a project analyst role with the support of a seasoned PM. Is it a general practice across the board or is it region or industry-specific?

The Communities of Practice is new to me but from some research undertaken, it is a key tool in the development of newbie practitioners. Thanks for this source of information.

Moreover in the scenario where the usage of Communities of Practice is limited or non-existent on a country or regional basis. Additionally, with a low pm maturity model, would the guild system be an asset? I agree that it would not be essential but would its value rise in particular countries that have not adopted certain models and practices that you have mentioned?
Stephen,

groups of professionals could consider themselves a guild and organise into one, becoming members of an association like PMI or IPMA or many others. Some are called guild like the Guild of Project Controls, others institutes. Most are not-for profits. Active Professionals are often members of several 'guilds'.

And there may be guilds in companies, often characterised by professional exchanges, a career path, mentorship programs, a role description, a curriculum to learn and a community of practice. This might or might not be supported by a PMO or by HR (at least the career path has to have corporate blessing).

Thomas
...
1 reply by Stephen Robin
Mar 25, 2022 3:08 PM
Stephen Robin
...
What I grasped, there are already organizations that basically function like guilds but do not subscribe to the moniker of one. The formal name of an association or institute would be preferred.

Interestingly enough, having a professional guild like the Project Controls Guild that offers training in a subset of project management piques my interest immensely. It leaves me curious about other guilds that function just like it. A project management guild revolving around core competencies seems like it would be of value.

Also what you describe as guilds in companies are basically internal guilds that come in different forms and functions. I don't see the necessity for a guild system to be approved by a PMO as it seems like an unnecessary restriction.

Thanks for the information, Thomas.
Mar 24, 2022 11:40 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Stephen -

While not referenced in most cases as a guild, it is common practice in many companies for those new to the PM profession to start in a project analyst role where they would be supporting a seasoned PM on a moderate to large sized project. Through that experience, the project analyst gains competency and is ready to be given their own project.

Another similar model is the use of Communities of Practice where PMs across an organization of different levels get together on a regular basis to share learnings and to identify opportunities for establishing mentor-mentee relationships.

Note that neither of these approaches require a PMO. If one exists, it might get involved in helping to stand up a CoP, but this is not essential.

Kiron
Stephen -

Starting as a Project Analyst (sometimes referred to as a Project Coordinator or Project Control Officer) is a fairly common practice and is not industry-specific. It usually comes down to the scale or size of the project where the PM benefits from having a right-hand person to help with a lot of the administrative aspects of the role, but that individual also can (in a pinch) act on behalf of the PM if required.

I feel that a guild is more advanced than a Community of Practice, so if there isn't the appetite for a CoP, there's unlikely to be that for establishing a meaningful guild.

Kiron
...
1 reply by Stephen Robin
Mar 25, 2022 3:20 PM
Stephen Robin
...
Thanks for the clarification on the defined roles and responsibilities.

Also, it would not be a feeling. A guild would be much broader in scope and range of activities undertaken in comparison to communities of practice.

Regarding the appetite for a guild, you would be right. A guild would require a certain number of members to join and maintain would most likely require a registration status and potential physical headquarters in comparison to a community of practice that can be formed informally or exist solely in the virtual space. So therefore if there is no real effort to form something as simple as a community of practice model, a guild would only stay as a thought.
Mar 25, 2022 5:44 AM
Replying to Thomas Walenta
...
Stephen,

groups of professionals could consider themselves a guild and organise into one, becoming members of an association like PMI or IPMA or many others. Some are called guild like the Guild of Project Controls, others institutes. Most are not-for profits. Active Professionals are often members of several 'guilds'.

And there may be guilds in companies, often characterised by professional exchanges, a career path, mentorship programs, a role description, a curriculum to learn and a community of practice. This might or might not be supported by a PMO or by HR (at least the career path has to have corporate blessing).

Thomas
What I grasped, there are already organizations that basically function like guilds but do not subscribe to the moniker of one. The formal name of an association or institute would be preferred.

Interestingly enough, having a professional guild like the Project Controls Guild that offers training in a subset of project management piques my interest immensely. It leaves me curious about other guilds that function just like it. A project management guild revolving around core competencies seems like it would be of value.

Also what you describe as guilds in companies are basically internal guilds that come in different forms and functions. I don't see the necessity for a guild system to be approved by a PMO as it seems like an unnecessary restriction.

Thanks for the information, Thomas.
...
1 reply by Thomas Walenta
Mar 25, 2022 5:34 PM
Thomas Walenta
...
Stephen

did not say approval but support. A guild needs to be initiated, gain members and meaning etc. and who better than a PMO could give that?
Mar 25, 2022 7:37 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Stephen -

Starting as a Project Analyst (sometimes referred to as a Project Coordinator or Project Control Officer) is a fairly common practice and is not industry-specific. It usually comes down to the scale or size of the project where the PM benefits from having a right-hand person to help with a lot of the administrative aspects of the role, but that individual also can (in a pinch) act on behalf of the PM if required.

I feel that a guild is more advanced than a Community of Practice, so if there isn't the appetite for a CoP, there's unlikely to be that for establishing a meaningful guild.

Kiron
Thanks for the clarification on the defined roles and responsibilities.

Also, it would not be a feeling. A guild would be much broader in scope and range of activities undertaken in comparison to communities of practice.

Regarding the appetite for a guild, you would be right. A guild would require a certain number of members to join and maintain would most likely require a registration status and potential physical headquarters in comparison to a community of practice that can be formed informally or exist solely in the virtual space. So therefore if there is no real effort to form something as simple as a community of practice model, a guild would only stay as a thought.
Mar 25, 2022 3:08 PM
Replying to Stephen Robin
...
What I grasped, there are already organizations that basically function like guilds but do not subscribe to the moniker of one. The formal name of an association or institute would be preferred.

Interestingly enough, having a professional guild like the Project Controls Guild that offers training in a subset of project management piques my interest immensely. It leaves me curious about other guilds that function just like it. A project management guild revolving around core competencies seems like it would be of value.

Also what you describe as guilds in companies are basically internal guilds that come in different forms and functions. I don't see the necessity for a guild system to be approved by a PMO as it seems like an unnecessary restriction.

Thanks for the information, Thomas.
Stephen

did not say approval but support. A guild needs to be initiated, gain members and meaning etc. and who better than a PMO could give that?
...
1 reply by Stephen Robin
Mar 25, 2022 8:40 PM
Stephen Robin
...
Thomas

Yes, I agree but isn't it likely there should be buy-in from the PMO before a guild is initiated? I don't see a guild functioning in a silo so some sort of approval is required not so?
Mar 25, 2022 5:34 PM
Replying to Thomas Walenta
...
Stephen

did not say approval but support. A guild needs to be initiated, gain members and meaning etc. and who better than a PMO could give that?
Thomas

Yes, I agree but isn't it likely there should be buy-in from the PMO before a guild is initiated? I don't see a guild functioning in a silo so some sort of approval is required not so?
You could make the case that PMI provides the framework for such a guild You start off as an apprentice then become a journeyperson when you pass your CAPM. You become a master when you pass your PMP. (The equivalent of Red Seal in many labour trades.)

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