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Topics: Leadership
How to assess personal ambitions and interests of others on the project
Hi all,

I am baffled by a particular question and looking for some pointers on this:

How does a project manager use a personal development review with a team member to assess the impact of their personal interests and ambitions on a project?

Thanks in advance.
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Aven -

Is this for a certification exam or for practical application? If the latter, then it is a good practice to meet with all of your team members to understand their personal goals and what they enjoy doing so that you can help them connect those to the work they will be performing and the purpose behind the project.

It's a win-win when a team member sees that there is something in the project which is helping them as much as it is helping the organization.

Kiron
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1 reply by Aven Kuznik
Apr 21, 2022 6:17 AM
Aven Kuznik
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Thank you for getting back to me Kiron.

This is a syllabus question related to an exam question.

I am just trying to understand the concept of how it can be used. I presume it is very similar to how a quarterly appraisal can be used to help with the operations of a company but in a project context.

So, let's say a team member enjoys auditing and wants to improve in this area during their PD review, they would be a good fit to help with the quality aspects of the project, gaining more motivation. Am on the right track in relation to this particular question?
Apr 20, 2022 6:49 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Aven -

Is this for a certification exam or for practical application? If the latter, then it is a good practice to meet with all of your team members to understand their personal goals and what they enjoy doing so that you can help them connect those to the work they will be performing and the purpose behind the project.

It's a win-win when a team member sees that there is something in the project which is helping them as much as it is helping the organization.

Kiron
Thank you for getting back to me Kiron.

This is a syllabus question related to an exam question.

I am just trying to understand the concept of how it can be used. I presume it is very similar to how a quarterly appraisal can be used to help with the operations of a company but in a project context.

So, let's say a team member enjoys auditing and wants to improve in this area during their PD review, they would be a good fit to help with the quality aspects of the project, gaining more motivation. Am on the right track in relation to this particular question?
Aven -

Yes, as PMs it is in the best interests of the organization, our project and our team members to take that time when a new team member joins to learn about their "hopes and dreams", and find out ways to connect those to what's needed to be done to successfully deliver the project.

While it doesn't need to be a formal or regularly scheduled process the way an annual or semi-annual HR performance evaluation would be, it is one way that the PM can show that they care about the folks working with them and can help to boost mastery which is one of the levers of unleashing intrinsic motivation.

Kiron
The personal development review process should be a two-way street. On the one hand, you want to see how well the team member's personal development journey dovetails with the project needs. This provides you with knowledge and insight for your project's personnel assignments and training.

On the other hand, you also have a chance to influence and guide the team member in their learning. I remember having a discussion with a technical writer suggesting he had the makings of a business analyst. On my following project, I offered him a business analysis assignment. He jumped at the opportunity and never looked back.
My recommendation is taking a closer look to SPIN Selling method. You can find it as Solution Selling too.

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