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Topics: Construction
If you are a project manager and your manager wants you to relocate from the head office to the site for a small project?
If you are a project manager and your manager wants you to relocate from the head office to the site for a small project that your vision is no need to that and this will be uncomfortable work nature to work with; what is your action towards this order from your manager? (NB: You have an open projects in a closing phase and you are in need to be at HQ to manage the closing phase closely)
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Seems like you are second guessing your manager. Maybe he has more information available than you. Maybe he has experienced a problem in the past he hopes to avoid. Maybe he feels you need on-site experience.

Have a one-on-one discussion and address his concerns. Maybe there is another way to approach these.

Second guessing your manager can be hazardous to your employment.
Mahmoud -

As Peter has indicated, there might be information you are missing which is driving the manager's decision. Meet with the manager to understand their perspective and also to share your concerns.

Kiron
In addition to understanding why your manager thinks this is a good idea, it also could be an opportunity disguised as a problem.

Even a temporary remote work assignment can come with a large personal cost. If you treat your job as a business, what competent business manager would take that kind of cost without compensation?

With large well known companies, this kind of assignment generally comes with an attractive compensation package, and can put you in a position for rapid promotion. If your manager is not planning to generously over-compensate you for this disruption, then I would consider that sub-standard across many industries and pay grades.

Something else to consider is what awaits you when you return from the assignment. What sometimes happens is that while you are on remote assignment, the market conditions change or due to management changes you can't return "home". If you work in a company that has multiple offices, sometimes work gets shifted between offices, and your prior job office is no longer in your home city.
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1 reply by Roland Vander Straeten
May 31, 2022 11:23 AM
Roland Vander Straeten
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I always saw those "problems" or "insecurities" as opportunities, and more than likely would be a career advancement either in your present company or another one. That in itself could be the "compensation": an addition to your resume.
Returning "home" has other effects. All in a sudden you are changing from a position where you essentially were "in charge", and coming home to your desk again may be a complete let-down.
As Keith suggests there are definitely some risks in this situation as well as possible benefits. Put your project management risk analysis knowledge to use - probability, impact, mitigation, response. You may be able to share these with management.
Best first action, like my fellow colleagues mentioned is to have one-to-one conversation with your manager.

At the end of the day, we sometimes have to go out of our way for the sake of the greater good which in this case, is the organitzation.
Mahmoud

Peter gives sound advice, as well as the others.

You experience a change, a disruption, and how you respond to it shows how much of a leader you are. How much resilient or even anti-fragile you are. And how you are in self-control of your feelings. How quickly you move along the change curve by Kubler Ross.

Normally we PMs bring disruptions to others.

Consider, if one of the scenarios you contemplate is that your manager wants to punish you, get rid of you or similar, then there is an underlying problem you cannot solve by fighting this request.

Like everybody said, talk to your manager, and also express your feelings, so he understands your view.

Thomas
Employment is essentially a contract between the employer and employee - the terms have to equally benefit both parties. If the employer wishes to change the initial contract to better suit their needs then they should allow the employee to likewise improve their benefit. I understand sometimes its not quite that simple but its a great way to look at the relationship and work towards a win-win solution - "What's in it for me?"
You better speak with your manager. communication is important.
Moreover, most changes can be seen as "uncomfortable"
May 28, 2022 1:23 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
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In addition to understanding why your manager thinks this is a good idea, it also could be an opportunity disguised as a problem.

Even a temporary remote work assignment can come with a large personal cost. If you treat your job as a business, what competent business manager would take that kind of cost without compensation?

With large well known companies, this kind of assignment generally comes with an attractive compensation package, and can put you in a position for rapid promotion. If your manager is not planning to generously over-compensate you for this disruption, then I would consider that sub-standard across many industries and pay grades.

Something else to consider is what awaits you when you return from the assignment. What sometimes happens is that while you are on remote assignment, the market conditions change or due to management changes you can't return "home". If you work in a company that has multiple offices, sometimes work gets shifted between offices, and your prior job office is no longer in your home city.
I always saw those "problems" or "insecurities" as opportunities, and more than likely would be a career advancement either in your present company or another one. That in itself could be the "compensation": an addition to your resume.
Returning "home" has other effects. All in a sudden you are changing from a position where you essentially were "in charge", and coming home to your desk again may be a complete let-down.
There are not a lot of valid reasons to say no to your boss. I once was asked to relocate for a five-year assignment. After a few months working on the contract with the client, it all fell apart. While I was not happy about losing the business for our company, at least I felt like I gave it my all.

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