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Topics: Business Analysis, Change Management, Healthcare
Have you ever been in a project situation where you were dependent on a resource that you knew that could not complete the deliverables? If so, what were your mitigation strategies?
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Well i would say discuss the matter with the resource/resource manager and confirm if they are comfortable with completion date of the deliverable or if there are any challenges identified in completing the deliverable. Creating an environment that allows open communication about challenges can put you on the front-foot to share these issues with client early and properly manage their expectations.
Jason -

Is this a question of their being able to finish the work on time or to a specific grade of quality? Is there an opportunity to pair them up with another team member to complete the deliverables?

If there are truly no options with the existing team makeup, then it depends on the level of formal authority you have over staffing the project team.

In a matrix or functional structure, you'd need to engage the person's manager to ensure they are aware of the issue and to get their assistance in resolving it. If it is a project-oriented structure, you'd need to decide what makes the most sense - get someone else to work with this team member, replace them with someone else, etc.

Regardless, there will be impacts to the project and potentially new risks introduced. You may also need to formalize these impacts via a change request...

Kiron
Sounds like the risk is no longer a probability but a reality. With a comprehensive Risk Management Program this risk should have been identified and mitigation measures already developed. It would have been better if the probability had been minimized - the plan being pre-active than re-active. Alas, here we are.

1) accept the situation, determine the consequences and advise the stakeholders.
2) re-work the critical path minimizing the impact of this particular hurdle.
3) add resources to the task (through staffing or sub-contracts)
4) Isolate the task from the rest of the project allowing for post-project delivery, or even non-delivery.
5) split the task with re-assignment of some parts.
There may be others subject to nature of the project and maybe a combination of mitigating measures.

Basically you have to re-visit the Plan (I would suggest this before going to the stakeholders), get buy-in and implement. Include for a Risk Management Plan with Risk Register to avoid future disappointments.
...
1 reply by Vijay Suryavanshi
Oct 17, 2022 9:57 PM
Vijay Suryavanshi
...
Yes, many times. Often times the design team I work with does not meet dates for deliverables. They are swamped or overloaded for one thing. And they crave for perfection which is another. My mitigation strategy has been to issue redline drawings to Mfg. While the design team takes their own sweet time to update drawings. Also I prioritize tasks in design or engineering and see which one is causing blocking point for other departments. I request the Design Director to get those deliverables out first. These are some ways I mitigate risk of deliverables not being complete. I also try to understand process and find workaround at times as well.
Oct 16, 2022 10:11 AM
Replying to Peter Rapin
...
Sounds like the risk is no longer a probability but a reality. With a comprehensive Risk Management Program this risk should have been identified and mitigation measures already developed. It would have been better if the probability had been minimized - the plan being pre-active than re-active. Alas, here we are.

1) accept the situation, determine the consequences and advise the stakeholders.
2) re-work the critical path minimizing the impact of this particular hurdle.
3) add resources to the task (through staffing or sub-contracts)
4) Isolate the task from the rest of the project allowing for post-project delivery, or even non-delivery.
5) split the task with re-assignment of some parts.
There may be others subject to nature of the project and maybe a combination of mitigating measures.

Basically you have to re-visit the Plan (I would suggest this before going to the stakeholders), get buy-in and implement. Include for a Risk Management Plan with Risk Register to avoid future disappointments.
Yes, many times. Often times the design team I work with does not meet dates for deliverables. They are swamped or overloaded for one thing. And they crave for perfection which is another. My mitigation strategy has been to issue redline drawings to Mfg. While the design team takes their own sweet time to update drawings. Also I prioritize tasks in design or engineering and see which one is causing blocking point for other departments. I request the Design Director to get those deliverables out first. These are some ways I mitigate risk of deliverables not being complete. I also try to understand process and find workaround at times as well.
...
2 replies by Peter Rapin and Vijay Suryavanshi
Oct 18, 2022 9:09 AM
Peter Rapin
...
There has to be a cost associated with this 'work-around'. It also seems to be very re-active. I question if its sustainable as delivery gets further and further behind, team gets more and more frustrated, more and more swamped and overloaded. I would really encourage an effort to get-on-top - prevent rather than accommodate. I know, easier said than done. Maybe if you can get the Design Director to recognize that it's his, and his teams, advantage to address the issue.
Good luck, Peter
Oct 18, 2022 1:04 PM
Vijay Suryavanshi
...
Engineering is complete in the form of redlines issued to Manufacturing. It gets updated and released in the electronic system slowly as many changes pile up together.
Oct 17, 2022 9:57 PM
Replying to Vijay Suryavanshi
...
Yes, many times. Often times the design team I work with does not meet dates for deliverables. They are swamped or overloaded for one thing. And they crave for perfection which is another. My mitigation strategy has been to issue redline drawings to Mfg. While the design team takes their own sweet time to update drawings. Also I prioritize tasks in design or engineering and see which one is causing blocking point for other departments. I request the Design Director to get those deliverables out first. These are some ways I mitigate risk of deliverables not being complete. I also try to understand process and find workaround at times as well.
There has to be a cost associated with this 'work-around'. It also seems to be very re-active. I question if its sustainable as delivery gets further and further behind, team gets more and more frustrated, more and more swamped and overloaded. I would really encourage an effort to get-on-top - prevent rather than accommodate. I know, easier said than done. Maybe if you can get the Design Director to recognize that it's his, and his teams, advantage to address the issue.
Good luck, Peter
...
1 reply by Vijay Suryavanshi
Oct 18, 2022 11:45 AM
Vijay Suryavanshi
...
Delivery of product is more important than engineering deliverables which are internal. The costs associated with it is paying Overtime for Engineers to do the work. It is difficult to get Engineering design director on board because he looks for more engineering hours to sustain his department. In the end it is a delicate balance. And I don’t think there is any reactionary thing that I do. It is all well thought and process followed solutions. For me getting the product out, keeping the customer happy is more important than meeting internal deadlines.
The first thing I would do is assess the impact. Can you absorb the late deliverables? Is this a major issue with c-suite visibility?

If I need to help getting resource priority, additional resources, or some kind of work-around, my managers usually want to know how hard they have to push. You need to pick your battles as they say.
Oct 18, 2022 9:09 AM
Replying to Peter Rapin
...
There has to be a cost associated with this 'work-around'. It also seems to be very re-active. I question if its sustainable as delivery gets further and further behind, team gets more and more frustrated, more and more swamped and overloaded. I would really encourage an effort to get-on-top - prevent rather than accommodate. I know, easier said than done. Maybe if you can get the Design Director to recognize that it's his, and his teams, advantage to address the issue.
Good luck, Peter
Delivery of product is more important than engineering deliverables which are internal. The costs associated with it is paying Overtime for Engineers to do the work. It is difficult to get Engineering design director on board because he looks for more engineering hours to sustain his department. In the end it is a delicate balance. And I don’t think there is any reactionary thing that I do. It is all well thought and process followed solutions. For me getting the product out, keeping the customer happy is more important than meeting internal deadlines.
...
1 reply by Peter Rapin
Oct 18, 2022 12:55 PM
Peter Rapin
...
In your scenario you are the Engineering Design Director's client. Maybe your drive to keep the client happy needs to be transfer to him. Maybe you need to find the pressure point to make him recognize you as his client - find/develop an alternate supplier.

I don't understand that you can deliver a product without the engineering being complete
That's a relevant debate and the contribution made by Peter Rapin, guided by the Risk Management aspects bring many positive and recordable steps to serve as input to the lessons learned also.
Oct 18, 2022 11:45 AM
Replying to Vijay Suryavanshi
...
Delivery of product is more important than engineering deliverables which are internal. The costs associated with it is paying Overtime for Engineers to do the work. It is difficult to get Engineering design director on board because he looks for more engineering hours to sustain his department. In the end it is a delicate balance. And I don’t think there is any reactionary thing that I do. It is all well thought and process followed solutions. For me getting the product out, keeping the customer happy is more important than meeting internal deadlines.
In your scenario you are the Engineering Design Director's client. Maybe your drive to keep the client happy needs to be transfer to him. Maybe you need to find the pressure point to make him recognize you as his client - find/develop an alternate supplier.

I don't understand that you can deliver a product without the engineering being complete
Oct 17, 2022 9:57 PM
Replying to Vijay Suryavanshi
...
Yes, many times. Often times the design team I work with does not meet dates for deliverables. They are swamped or overloaded for one thing. And they crave for perfection which is another. My mitigation strategy has been to issue redline drawings to Mfg. While the design team takes their own sweet time to update drawings. Also I prioritize tasks in design or engineering and see which one is causing blocking point for other departments. I request the Design Director to get those deliverables out first. These are some ways I mitigate risk of deliverables not being complete. I also try to understand process and find workaround at times as well.
Engineering is complete in the form of redlines issued to Manufacturing. It gets updated and released in the electronic system slowly as many changes pile up together.
...
1 reply by Peter Rapin
Oct 18, 2022 2:06 PM
Peter Rapin
...
As I see it you are entering a different phase of the project - the product has been delivered but effort is still being applied. It happens in the infrastructure industry as well where occupancy is provided but deficiencies continue to be addressed. Maybe this is unavoidable, but it needs to be controlled. In some cases, it may be a quality management issue where "we'll fix it later" becomes the response of the day.

If the post-delivery adjustments/changes are unavoidable there have to be targets and control mechanisms in place. With infrastructure construction we tend to apply 97% rule-of -thumb for 'substantial' complete with reasonable time (weeks, months depending on project complexity) defined for 100%. Warrantee period starting at 100% (not 97%). This phase should be recognized and acknowledge in the Project Charter.

I worry about a project bleeding to death - team disbanded/re-assigned, budget thin if any and interest/motivation diminished.
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