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Delivery a programme or project, of what important a synergy is to a programme or project and personnels in a project?
Every cause of action is stimulated by level of understanding. When a programme or project is perfectly understood the actions that follow become more easier to achieve.
This is why a project must be carefully study and understood before embarking on the execution, i.e action.

However, some time, this happen when a programme or project designer, planner differs from the project executor which is a common phenomenon in a project.
Both can be seen as professionals but the picture and view might be slight different in the programme or project in some areas which could cause a crack on any project delivery or finishing. In other words, addition and subtraction must be jointly done for a pretty finishing. In order to close the gap if there is any, there should be a synergy of professionalism that bridges the perspective.

Personnel management understanding in programme or project should also be taken into serious consideration from the beginning (planning, designing etc) to the finishing (executing, implementing etc). This will result to a robust project execution.

Visiting and revisiting will ensure planned and actions are successfully done. This will help especially the medium and big programme or project. Technical understanding is empirical and paramount to both in an execution and finishing of programme or project.
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Thanks Esosa -

Alignment of key roles (e.g. program manager, project manager, team member) and synchronization/orchestration of work efforts to ensure everyone is working towards the same outcomes are critical actions for those in project leadership roles.

Kiron
There is a key word missing into the post: solution. We contribute to create solutions where solution is equal to "the thing" to be create plus "the way" to create it. Putting this in the context of PMI (and beyond that what exists into the industry) the first component belongs to business annalists domain. Without "the thing" definition "the way" can not be defined. Because of that the business analyst is a critical role for other critical activity: make a situational annalisis to define the approach to be taken to create the solution.
Handoffs, cross-training and knowledge transfer are key activities to ensure the original vision remains until project closure.
Esosa,

yes, you mention two important aspects for project managers.

1. the gap between planning and execution by different people is inevitable. The targets for both are mostly different (sales guy gets bonus for selling, PM gets bonus for profits) and any handover communication is error prone.

There is the famous fable of a sales guy and a PM going on a safari, sleeping in a hut with a door and a window: The sales guy goes out before breakfast and returns running thru the door chased by a lion. He yells at the PM 'take this, I am going to get another' and jumps out the window.

2. And your second point about personnel: I would not use this term but the term fellow human. Any project or solution is different with different humans as team members, customers or other stakeholders.

It has been proven that PM theory, rationality and systems thinking (which take the form of methods, processes, tools) is not sufficient for success, note even leading to success. It is the human side, the culture, the leadership which makes the difference.

Thomas
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1 reply by Stéphane Parent
Nov 20, 2022 11:51 AM
Stéphane Parent
...
You reminded me of another story, Thomas.

There was a salesperson, an engineer and a project manager driving to a company conference. The car got a flat. The three of them got out of the car and stared at the deflated tire.

The salesperson said they needed a new car. The engineer said he could take air from the other three tires and put it in the flat one. The project manager looked to the right, looked to the left, then said: "Let's get back into the car and drive off. Maybe nobody will notice?"
Nov 20, 2022 10:58 AM
Replying to Thomas Walenta
...
Esosa,

yes, you mention two important aspects for project managers.

1. the gap between planning and execution by different people is inevitable. The targets for both are mostly different (sales guy gets bonus for selling, PM gets bonus for profits) and any handover communication is error prone.

There is the famous fable of a sales guy and a PM going on a safari, sleeping in a hut with a door and a window: The sales guy goes out before breakfast and returns running thru the door chased by a lion. He yells at the PM 'take this, I am going to get another' and jumps out the window.

2. And your second point about personnel: I would not use this term but the term fellow human. Any project or solution is different with different humans as team members, customers or other stakeholders.

It has been proven that PM theory, rationality and systems thinking (which take the form of methods, processes, tools) is not sufficient for success, note even leading to success. It is the human side, the culture, the leadership which makes the difference.

Thomas
You reminded me of another story, Thomas.

There was a salesperson, an engineer and a project manager driving to a company conference. The car got a flat. The three of them got out of the car and stared at the deflated tire.

The salesperson said they needed a new car. The engineer said he could take air from the other three tires and put it in the flat one. The project manager looked to the right, looked to the left, then said: "Let's get back into the car and drive off. Maybe nobody will notice?"
...
1 reply by Thomas Walenta
Nov 20, 2022 1:05 PM
Thomas Walenta
...
Haha, good one. New for me.
That’s why we have so many grey swans.
Nov 20, 2022 11:51 AM
Replying to Stéphane Parent
...
You reminded me of another story, Thomas.

There was a salesperson, an engineer and a project manager driving to a company conference. The car got a flat. The three of them got out of the car and stared at the deflated tire.

The salesperson said they needed a new car. The engineer said he could take air from the other three tires and put it in the flat one. The project manager looked to the right, looked to the left, then said: "Let's get back into the car and drive off. Maybe nobody will notice?"
Haha, good one. New for me.
That’s why we have so many grey swans.
I have a problem with the opening statement "When a programme or project is perfectly understood the actions that follow become more easier to achieve". Its the 'deliverable' or 'solution' that has to be clearly defined and understood. I see the 'project' or 'programme' to include the delivery process which has to have flexibility to adjust for the unknowns. One has to understand what needs to be achieved - the how will evolve as the project advances.

The Risk Management Plan has to identify that there will be different interpretations as to what needs to be achieved and recognize that there are more than one way to to get there. The plan needs to allow for finding the route most likely to achieve success with built in flexibility to adjust for changing conditions.
The fable of Stephane is funny, especially the words said by the Project Manager.

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