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Topics: Construction
Improving Outcomes in Construction Projects
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Rami Kaibni
Community Champion
Senior Projects Manager | Field & Marten Associates New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada
In today's world, with the increasing complexity and interconnections within the construction industry, collaborative project delivery methods have emerged as powerful tools for enhancing efficiency and optimizing outcomes. How can the construction industry leverage collaborative project delivery methods such as integrated project delivery (IPD) and building information modeling (BIM) to streamline project delivery and improve outcomes?
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Robert Maiale
PMI Team Member
Construction Product Owner| Project Management Institute Wellington, Fl, USA
A great question, Rami! BIM has been around for a long time, yet there are many organizations who don't utilize it. I suspect it may be a combination of cost and the learning curve. For the IPD, we are hoping that this curriculum starts a groundswell in that direction. It removes the adversarial aspect where all parties have skin in the game. This should drive better outcomes.
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1 reply by Rami Kaibni
May 28, 2024 5:42 PM
Rami Kaibni
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Bob, I totally agree with you with regards to BIM utilization. For example, I’ve noticed that adoption of BIM in North America is much slower than the Middle East. In 2006, when I was working in Qatar, we were already utilising BIM on our construction projects but then when I moved to North American in 2013, specifically Canada, I’ve noticed that BIM wasn’t used much, however, over the last few years, it gained more traction (They use a program called Revit).

Regarding IPD, the current construction curriculum definitely provides a well-structured direction towards that path.

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Rami Kaibni
Community Champion
Senior Projects Manager | Field & Marten Associates New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada
May 28, 2024 11:27 AM
Replying to Robert Maiale
...
A great question, Rami! BIM has been around for a long time, yet there are many organizations who don't utilize it. I suspect it may be a combination of cost and the learning curve. For the IPD, we are hoping that this curriculum starts a groundswell in that direction. It removes the adversarial aspect where all parties have skin in the game. This should drive better outcomes.

Bob, I totally agree with you with regards to BIM utilization. For example, I’ve noticed that adoption of BIM in North America is much slower than the Middle East. In 2006, when I was working in Qatar, we were already utilising BIM on our construction projects but then when I moved to North American in 2013, specifically Canada, I’ve noticed that BIM wasn’t used much, however, over the last few years, it gained more traction (They use a program called Revit).

Regarding IPD, the current construction curriculum definitely provides a well-structured direction towards that path.

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Keith Novak Tukwila, Wa, USA
I would suspect cost is one of the biggest obstacles, especially for larger companies that have been around a long time such that digital transformation requires maintaining multiple systems with separate sets of people skilled at using them. It's typically over 2 years for employees to become comfortable and fully competent using new systems so there is often a lot of risk involved before the company can see improvements on the balance sheets from a major overhaul. I have seen large firms write off billions on miracle systems that didn't deliver the massive savings advertised.

Construction is also an industry where you have a lot of "old school" businesses and employees where there is a lot of resistance to change. We have tried implementing more intuitive manufacturing instructions using computer aided tools but find resistance from mechanics who want everything printed out on paper and believe the additional information available just ads confusion. I suspect that businesses in the ME are relatively newer overall due to the timeline of large scale development in the region (pyramids not withstanding). Many older companies still use materials management systems originating from Henry Ford, converted to primitive 1980s computers, and then kept running with duct tape and bailing wire ever since. It can be easier to implement new technology without all that long term baggage.

I think a critical component is having a lightweight user interface for those who only need a specific view of the integrated data. Supply chains run deep and different uses interface with different parts of the larger database. Generating custom views of the bigger picture for specific job roles requires less training to effectively use the technology while providing all the information people need to do their work yet not so much extra information that it becomes overwhelming.
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1 reply by Rami Kaibni
Jul 08, 2024 3:36 PM
Rami Kaibni
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Great point if view, Keith. I do agree with you especially on the Resistance to Change part.
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Aung Sint
Community Champion
Senior Consultant| Laminar Projects
In my own experience regarding BIM deployment in construction projects in Singapore, a push from the government or statutory requirement, similar to health and safety, might help so that the industrial players must abide by the regulations. Of course, sufficient time must be given for adoption and adjustment as well as some monetary incentives might help.
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1 reply by Rami Kaibni
Jul 08, 2024 3:37 PM
Rami Kaibni
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A push from the government would certainly help Aung, big time. It's like having buy-in from the most influential stakeholder.
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William M Hayden Jr Adjunct Assistant Professor| University at Buffalo, School of Management, Operations Management & Strategy Buffalo, Ny, USA
Thanks Rami!
Re: "How can the construction industry leverage collaborative project delivery methods such as integrated project delivery (IPD) and building information modeling (BIM) to streamline project delivery and improve outcomes?"

Based on various studies of projects/programs that miss their contractual requirements for scope, schedule and budget, we learn that . . .initially. . . the technology used accounted for less than 5 to 10% of the loss.

At least 75% or more of the losses were caused by lack of knowledge and skill
"How to play nice with others."

i.e., People, process, and lack of leadership that matters.

Cheers,
Bill
p.s. If I may suggest, BEFORE replying to this brief note, go to "Google Scholar" and checkout the assertions made above.
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1 reply by Rami Kaibni
Jul 08, 2024 3:38 PM
Rami Kaibni
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Bill, I don't believe I did get your point or how it relates to the question so if you cold elaborate further, that would be great!
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Neil Lowhar Senior Project Manager| Proplanix Consulting Group Whitby, Ontario, Canada
Step in the right direction, the government of Ontario is piloting digital twins on 3 of it's projects:
https://news.ontario.ca/en/release/1004760...tructure-faster
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1 reply by Rami Kaibni
Jul 08, 2024 3:40 PM
Rami Kaibni
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Neil, this is very interesting and definitely a step in the right direction. Thank you for sharing!
avatar
Rami Kaibni
Community Champion
Senior Projects Manager | Field & Marten Associates New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada
May 28, 2024 7:46 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
...
I would suspect cost is one of the biggest obstacles, especially for larger companies that have been around a long time such that digital transformation requires maintaining multiple systems with separate sets of people skilled at using them. It's typically over 2 years for employees to become comfortable and fully competent using new systems so there is often a lot of risk involved before the company can see improvements on the balance sheets from a major overhaul. I have seen large firms write off billions on miracle systems that didn't deliver the massive savings advertised.

Construction is also an industry where you have a lot of "old school" businesses and employees where there is a lot of resistance to change. We have tried implementing more intuitive manufacturing instructions using computer aided tools but find resistance from mechanics who want everything printed out on paper and believe the additional information available just ads confusion. I suspect that businesses in the ME are relatively newer overall due to the timeline of large scale development in the region (pyramids not withstanding). Many older companies still use materials management systems originating from Henry Ford, converted to primitive 1980s computers, and then kept running with duct tape and bailing wire ever since. It can be easier to implement new technology without all that long term baggage.

I think a critical component is having a lightweight user interface for those who only need a specific view of the integrated data. Supply chains run deep and different uses interface with different parts of the larger database. Generating custom views of the bigger picture for specific job roles requires less training to effectively use the technology while providing all the information people need to do their work yet not so much extra information that it becomes overwhelming.
Great point if view, Keith. I do agree with you especially on the Resistance to Change part.
avatar
Rami Kaibni
Community Champion
Senior Projects Manager | Field & Marten Associates New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada
May 29, 2024 1:39 AM
Replying to Aung Sint
...
In my own experience regarding BIM deployment in construction projects in Singapore, a push from the government or statutory requirement, similar to health and safety, might help so that the industrial players must abide by the regulations. Of course, sufficient time must be given for adoption and adjustment as well as some monetary incentives might help.
A push from the government would certainly help Aung, big time. It's like having buy-in from the most influential stakeholder.
avatar
Rami Kaibni
Community Champion
Senior Projects Manager | Field & Marten Associates New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada
Jun 25, 2024 8:52 AM
Replying to William M Hayden Jr
...
Thanks Rami!
Re: "How can the construction industry leverage collaborative project delivery methods such as integrated project delivery (IPD) and building information modeling (BIM) to streamline project delivery and improve outcomes?"

Based on various studies of projects/programs that miss their contractual requirements for scope, schedule and budget, we learn that . . .initially. . . the technology used accounted for less than 5 to 10% of the loss.

At least 75% or more of the losses were caused by lack of knowledge and skill
"How to play nice with others."

i.e., People, process, and lack of leadership that matters.

Cheers,
Bill
p.s. If I may suggest, BEFORE replying to this brief note, go to "Google Scholar" and checkout the assertions made above.
Bill, I don't believe I did get your point or how it relates to the question so if you cold elaborate further, that would be great!
avatar
Rami Kaibni
Community Champion
Senior Projects Manager | Field & Marten Associates New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada
Jul 08, 2024 2:56 PM
Replying to Neil Lowhar
...
Step in the right direction, the government of Ontario is piloting digital twins on 3 of it's projects:
https://news.ontario.ca/en/release/1004760...tructure-faster
Neil, this is very interesting and definitely a step in the right direction. Thank you for sharing!

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