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Tell us your pm love story! Why do you love project management?
Network:1618



We want to hear from YOU!

Tell us why you love being a project manager,
About a project you loved working on, OR
Why you love being part of project management

All posts published between 1 February and 15 February 12:00 am will be considered for a feature in a future ProjectManagement.com publication!

Want to take it up a notch? Send us a video of yourself sharing your love story for project management via the dropbox link below and we’ll share it on our YouTube channel.

https://www.dropbox.com/request/Fnsuk4HIM2IWPTaHoYzy
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Network:2064



Hey Great idea !.
The only way to great work is to love what you do ! - Steve Jobs
Network:1602



@Priya. My father told me (about 100 years ago now). "Do for a living what you love to do, and you'll be rich." I don't think he meant wealthy.
...
1 reply by Anupam Ganguly
Oct 25, 2016 8:51 AM
Anupam Ganguly
...
I agree on that.
Network:2784



I love being a project manager because this role

1.Provides lot of challenges that give motivation.
2.Demands continuous learning.
3.Makes me flexible and adaptable to any situation
4.Gives me the opportunity to recognize team members for their GOOD JOB ,coach them,mentor them to achieve success in their career.
5.Gives an opportunity to be part of organization's growth by successfully delivering the project.
6.Last but not least gives a sense of pride as I am responsible for the success of customer,organization and people.
...
1 reply by Paulo Ricardo dos Santos
Feb 09, 2016 10:39 AM
Paulo Ricardo dos Santos
...
I agree with you Bala S Duvvuri!
I like to think in delevering results!
Network:1602



WHY I LOVE PROJECT MANAGEMENT – DELICIOUS COMPLEXITY

Through some mysterious series of events, I became a full-fledged nerd at an early age. I loved all things mathematical. As evidence of my early nerd-hood, I asked for a complete set of the books of Euclid for Christmas when I was very young and studied it every night. Why? It was complicated, tricky and with a small mistake – led me down the wrong path. Something like a modern video game actually.

ENGINEERING BACKGROUND

Later at University, I studied Electrical Engineering for the same reasons. You could represent a very complex machine, with adjustments and controls; and while you planned for the right output, you very likely didn’t get it. Often you got something slightly off, or sometimes even WAY off what was expected. Arcs, sparks, ozone, snaps… All indications of something not quite right. But normally, you could get something working just the way you wanted.

As a young adult, I went to work at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston TX, USA. There again, I found complex problems - very complex problems. We had predicted solutions and many times difficult-to-obtain results. But we did get results. And, I admit, I had a large ego. I was a native New Yorker, a smarty and was working in a dream job. A LARGE EGO. (Later to be tamed, I quickly add).

One day, my section chief asked if I would manage a group of engineers to solve a small part of a big problem – a PROJECT! Not knowing what a project was, or what managing one meant, I of course, said yes. Thereby, another accidental project manager was created. My project was a small part of the solution to the TAEM problem (Terminal Area Energy Management) or, “How do you take the Orbiter from on-orbit, lacking any fuel, and return it to a landing strip to a roll-out?”

LEADING A PROJECT TEAM

Being expected to lead a group of like-minded individuals, things became infinitely more complex. We had a diverse set of skills, physicists, mathematicians, engineers, programmers and so on. Each one had their own deliciously complex world to deal with. And, each world was different. Finally, it dawned on me that now that I was supposed to lead this team, I realized I had the most complex device of everyone. I had a group of HUMANS!

There were no equations, no indicators, no displays no controls – yet I was charged with making this gloriously complex “machine” work. Human interactions, emotions, abilities, intuition – all sorts of things came into play. Things that ProjectManagment.com is filled with discussions of became my new learning area. I had finally discovered the world’s most deliciously complex machine. A team of humans trying to accomplish something.

But, there was help. We had a great set of OPA – Organizational Process Assets and it was a very good set. There were standards for planning, for monitoring progress, for assessing risk, for all the things on the “technical” side of Project Management. And, I had wonderful mentors that I still keep in contact with today.

DEFENDING THE TRUTH

Part of our culture was a monthly project review. This is where the Project Manager stands up in front of an audience of seasoned professionals and defending “their good works.” There was one PM on stage, and about 100 or so people in the audience. At first, it felt as if their job was to throw stones at me during my presentation. Audience member: “Mr. Maynard, could you please explain why you chose to ignore the possibility that your solution may exceed computational capacity?” Me: “Uh…”

But it quickly became clear this peer review was a wonderfully-crafted educational process to teach me methods to manage a project and at the same time pretty much cured my large ego issue. They would point out what I had missed, what I should consider, what I could have done better. In other words, how to manage or control the deliciously complex machine – the project and the team.

So, the bottom line of this essay is the same as the title. Why do you love project management? Because it’s a deliciously complex

Oh! I almost forgot! I met my wife at NASA, on a project. That's part of the love story too. But she worked with scientists not engineers. Oh well...
...
2 replies by Anna Keavney and Rebecca Braglio
Feb 01, 2016 2:57 PM
Rebecca Braglio
...
love the title :) it's delicious.
Feb 10, 2016 8:21 PM
Anna Keavney
...
What a great story and journey Dave Maynard, thanks for sharing
Network:586



Feb 01, 2016 1:41 PM
Replying to David Maynard
...
WHY I LOVE PROJECT MANAGEMENT – DELICIOUS COMPLEXITY

Through some mysterious series of events, I became a full-fledged nerd at an early age. I loved all things mathematical. As evidence of my early nerd-hood, I asked for a complete set of the books of Euclid for Christmas when I was very young and studied it every night. Why? It was complicated, tricky and with a small mistake – led me down the wrong path. Something like a modern video game actually.

ENGINEERING BACKGROUND

Later at University, I studied Electrical Engineering for the same reasons. You could represent a very complex machine, with adjustments and controls; and while you planned for the right output, you very likely didn’t get it. Often you got something slightly off, or sometimes even WAY off what was expected. Arcs, sparks, ozone, snaps… All indications of something not quite right. But normally, you could get something working just the way you wanted.

As a young adult, I went to work at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston TX, USA. There again, I found complex problems - very complex problems. We had predicted solutions and many times difficult-to-obtain results. But we did get results. And, I admit, I had a large ego. I was a native New Yorker, a smarty and was working in a dream job. A LARGE EGO. (Later to be tamed, I quickly add).

One day, my section chief asked if I would manage a group of engineers to solve a small part of a big problem – a PROJECT! Not knowing what a project was, or what managing one meant, I of course, said yes. Thereby, another accidental project manager was created. My project was a small part of the solution to the TAEM problem (Terminal Area Energy Management) or, “How do you take the Orbiter from on-orbit, lacking any fuel, and return it to a landing strip to a roll-out?”

LEADING A PROJECT TEAM

Being expected to lead a group of like-minded individuals, things became infinitely more complex. We had a diverse set of skills, physicists, mathematicians, engineers, programmers and so on. Each one had their own deliciously complex world to deal with. And, each world was different. Finally, it dawned on me that now that I was supposed to lead this team, I realized I had the most complex device of everyone. I had a group of HUMANS!

There were no equations, no indicators, no displays no controls – yet I was charged with making this gloriously complex “machine” work. Human interactions, emotions, abilities, intuition – all sorts of things came into play. Things that ProjectManagment.com is filled with discussions of became my new learning area. I had finally discovered the world’s most deliciously complex machine. A team of humans trying to accomplish something.

But, there was help. We had a great set of OPA – Organizational Process Assets and it was a very good set. There were standards for planning, for monitoring progress, for assessing risk, for all the things on the “technical” side of Project Management. And, I had wonderful mentors that I still keep in contact with today.

DEFENDING THE TRUTH

Part of our culture was a monthly project review. This is where the Project Manager stands up in front of an audience of seasoned professionals and defending “their good works.” There was one PM on stage, and about 100 or so people in the audience. At first, it felt as if their job was to throw stones at me during my presentation. Audience member: “Mr. Maynard, could you please explain why you chose to ignore the possibility that your solution may exceed computational capacity?” Me: “Uh…”

But it quickly became clear this peer review was a wonderfully-crafted educational process to teach me methods to manage a project and at the same time pretty much cured my large ego issue. They would point out what I had missed, what I should consider, what I could have done better. In other words, how to manage or control the deliciously complex machine – the project and the team.

So, the bottom line of this essay is the same as the title. Why do you love project management? Because it’s a deliciously complex

Oh! I almost forgot! I met my wife at NASA, on a project. That's part of the love story too. But she worked with scientists not engineers. Oh well...
love the title :) it's delicious.
Network:3842



Love the video of you two! Well done and well shared (at least on my part)!
...
2 replies by David Maynard and Kristin Jones
Feb 01, 2016 3:42 PM
David Maynard
...
Agree. It's like the MTV of dotCOM
Feb 02, 2016 9:03 AM
Kristin Jones
...
Thank you!
Network:1602



Feb 01, 2016 3:28 PM
Replying to Mike Frenette
...
Love the video of you two! Well done and well shared (at least on my part)!
Agree. It's like the MTV of dotCOM
Network:98140



In my high school graduation yearbook, a friend wrote: "Don't do what you love, love what you do." It stuck with me to this very day.

Specifically, project management gives me the best of both worlds: management and technology. I have spent my whole career flip flopping between these two seemingly disparate professions. I have found project management to be the perfect bridge. It allows me to have my cake and eat it too!
Network:1954



I love being project manager because I am exited to be part of projects which are different, complex, exciting and challenging. It gives me opportunity to work with different people from different countries, culture and to learn from them. As PM, everyday I get to learn more about business, people, technology and culture.
Network:199



I love being a PM because let me the opportunity to deal with various and different subjects (mechanics, electronics, software) and it requires continuous learning. Moreover give me the opportunity to be a learner but also a teacher and a coach. Moreover I always loved transform complex and wide problems in simple solutions and be a PM can give me this opportunity because you start from complex and wide inputs (requirements, risks and so on) and you finally release a single product or deliverable that solve this... obviously when a project is a success ;-)
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