Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Topics: Agile, Construction
Agile tools/methods for construction to suggest?
Network:73909



Agile as a look of tools/methods made for IT project. Agile can be use in other industries but you should use tools/methods that are made for that industry.

Any suggestion for construction?
Sort By:
Page: 1 2 3 next>
Network:914



There are some good articles on the application of agile and Lean principles to Construction, where you can find tools/methods that are made for that industry.

An Agile Construction Project by Chris Klein: http://chrisklein.wordpress.com/2009/11/02...uction-project/

Agile and Lean Applied to Construction by Adrian Smith: http://ennova.com.au/blog/2011/09/agile-le...ed-construction

Agile Construction Projects by Brian Doll: http://emphaticsolutions.com/2011/04/23/ag...n-projects.html

Lean Agile in Construction Projects – 9/11/11 – 10 Years Later (Agilescout): http://agilescout.com/lean-agile-in-constr...-10-years-later
...
3 replies by Anupam Ganguly, Mounir Ajam, and Vincent Guerard
Nov 17, 2016 11:28 PM
Anupam Ganguly
...
Thanks Mauro for sharing these links.

There is a misconception on Agile that it is specific to IT only.
Nov 18, 2016 9:53 AM
Vincent Guerard
...
Thanks Mauro,

I will look them up.
Oct 27, 2017 2:55 AM
Mounir Ajam
...
I am sorry but what I read on these posts (links) is describing good old-fashioned project management practices.

I think we need to go back to the basic principles of Agile ... Agile, as in product delivery methods, is about delivering working products fast (short term) in increments or sprints.
Network:4314



Nov 17, 2016 9:13 PM
Replying to Mauro Sotille
...
There are some good articles on the application of agile and Lean principles to Construction, where you can find tools/methods that are made for that industry.

An Agile Construction Project by Chris Klein: http://chrisklein.wordpress.com/2009/11/02...uction-project/

Agile and Lean Applied to Construction by Adrian Smith: http://ennova.com.au/blog/2011/09/agile-le...ed-construction

Agile Construction Projects by Brian Doll: http://emphaticsolutions.com/2011/04/23/ag...n-projects.html

Lean Agile in Construction Projects – 9/11/11 – 10 Years Later (Agilescout): http://agilescout.com/lean-agile-in-constr...-10-years-later
Thanks Mauro for sharing these links.

There is a misconception on Agile that it is specific to IT only.
Network:73909



Nov 17, 2016 9:13 PM
Replying to Mauro Sotille
...
There are some good articles on the application of agile and Lean principles to Construction, where you can find tools/methods that are made for that industry.

An Agile Construction Project by Chris Klein: http://chrisklein.wordpress.com/2009/11/02...uction-project/

Agile and Lean Applied to Construction by Adrian Smith: http://ennova.com.au/blog/2011/09/agile-le...ed-construction

Agile Construction Projects by Brian Doll: http://emphaticsolutions.com/2011/04/23/ag...n-projects.html

Lean Agile in Construction Projects – 9/11/11 – 10 Years Later (Agilescout): http://agilescout.com/lean-agile-in-constr...-10-years-later
Thanks Mauro,

I will look them up.
Network:629



You can certainly borrow agile principles and apply them to a construction project. I would hesitate, however, to say that you can strictly apply the Scrum framework to construction. Two reasons for this hesitancy are scale and process.

Let’s use the classic example of building a house. If you are building a house, you have greater impact caused by dependencies between tasks, which you are supposed to avoid in Scrum. Once the foundation is poured, there is not much you can do, until it is cured enough for the next phase of construction. However, if you are building a subdivision, this dependency is minimized because waiting for one foundation to cure is not going to prevent other work from happening in other parts of the subdivision.

Perhaps the biggest reason for saying that agile won’t work for construction is the concept of MVP, or Minimum Viable Product. In software development, I can deliver a working product with minimal functionality. The users can use the software while my team continues to add features and functionality. In construction, at least in the US, nobody can legally use the building until it is finished, having successfully gone through several types of inspections. If I were building a road, there are different stages where a road is not finished, but is still usable, but I might not be able to work on it while people are using it. If I were building a bridge, nobody would want to use it before I was finished.

You might be able to use agile to create some of the materials used in construction, like components for a pre-fab home, but the question should not be whether to use agile. A better question is what problem are you trying to solve? You may not be able to apply a specific flavor of agile, but the agile manifesto identifies principles that can be applied to improve the process and outcome of your project.
...
1 reply by Vincent Guerard
Nov 18, 2016 9:29 PM
Vincent Guerard
...
Thanks Aaron,
Just returning from Agile Montreal 2016, in one of the keynotes it was suggested to avoid using most of the tool and methods that where developed for the software industry such as Scrum. But to look at adapted tools and methodologies for your industry. Reason of starting this discussion.

Agile origin can be track to industrial era of the late 1800 and also US military building a fighter in the 1950s, well before Agile manifesto.

In a large building you could probably complete a unit/section or part and optimize for the next unit then repeat the process
Network:73909



Nov 18, 2016 3:49 PM
Replying to Aaron Porter
...
You can certainly borrow agile principles and apply them to a construction project. I would hesitate, however, to say that you can strictly apply the Scrum framework to construction. Two reasons for this hesitancy are scale and process.

Let’s use the classic example of building a house. If you are building a house, you have greater impact caused by dependencies between tasks, which you are supposed to avoid in Scrum. Once the foundation is poured, there is not much you can do, until it is cured enough for the next phase of construction. However, if you are building a subdivision, this dependency is minimized because waiting for one foundation to cure is not going to prevent other work from happening in other parts of the subdivision.

Perhaps the biggest reason for saying that agile won’t work for construction is the concept of MVP, or Minimum Viable Product. In software development, I can deliver a working product with minimal functionality. The users can use the software while my team continues to add features and functionality. In construction, at least in the US, nobody can legally use the building until it is finished, having successfully gone through several types of inspections. If I were building a road, there are different stages where a road is not finished, but is still usable, but I might not be able to work on it while people are using it. If I were building a bridge, nobody would want to use it before I was finished.

You might be able to use agile to create some of the materials used in construction, like components for a pre-fab home, but the question should not be whether to use agile. A better question is what problem are you trying to solve? You may not be able to apply a specific flavor of agile, but the agile manifesto identifies principles that can be applied to improve the process and outcome of your project.
Thanks Aaron,
Just returning from Agile Montreal 2016, in one of the keynotes it was suggested to avoid using most of the tool and methods that where developed for the software industry such as Scrum. But to look at adapted tools and methodologies for your industry. Reason of starting this discussion.

Agile origin can be track to industrial era of the late 1800 and also US military building a fighter in the 1950s, well before Agile manifesto.

In a large building you could probably complete a unit/section or part and optimize for the next unit then repeat the process
...
1 reply by Mounir Ajam
Oct 27, 2017 2:59 AM
Mounir Ajam
...
Vincent,

Can you explain to us how to deliver a building project using Agile Product Delivery or Scrum? The key word here is "project"; construction is a phase, not a project. But I am willing to accept focusing on construction.

Another key word (or phrase) is "Working Product"
Network:678



Nov 17, 2016 9:13 PM
Replying to Mauro Sotille
...
There are some good articles on the application of agile and Lean principles to Construction, where you can find tools/methods that are made for that industry.

An Agile Construction Project by Chris Klein: http://chrisklein.wordpress.com/2009/11/02...uction-project/

Agile and Lean Applied to Construction by Adrian Smith: http://ennova.com.au/blog/2011/09/agile-le...ed-construction

Agile Construction Projects by Brian Doll: http://emphaticsolutions.com/2011/04/23/ag...n-projects.html

Lean Agile in Construction Projects – 9/11/11 – 10 Years Later (Agilescout): http://agilescout.com/lean-agile-in-constr...-10-years-later
I am sorry but what I read on these posts (links) is describing good old-fashioned project management practices.

I think we need to go back to the basic principles of Agile ... Agile, as in product delivery methods, is about delivering working products fast (short term) in increments or sprints.
Network:678



Nov 18, 2016 9:29 PM
Replying to Vincent Guerard
...
Thanks Aaron,
Just returning from Agile Montreal 2016, in one of the keynotes it was suggested to avoid using most of the tool and methods that where developed for the software industry such as Scrum. But to look at adapted tools and methodologies for your industry. Reason of starting this discussion.

Agile origin can be track to industrial era of the late 1800 and also US military building a fighter in the 1950s, well before Agile manifesto.

In a large building you could probably complete a unit/section or part and optimize for the next unit then repeat the process
Vincent,

Can you explain to us how to deliver a building project using Agile Product Delivery or Scrum? The key word here is "project"; construction is a phase, not a project. But I am willing to accept focusing on construction.

Another key word (or phrase) is "Working Product"
Network:1337



@Mounir, just a brief comment. You can use Agile with waterfall life cycle process life cycle. There is a general confusion about to apply Agile a adaptive life cycle model with an interative/incremental life cycle process is needed. In my case, in 1999, we use DSDM (on that time an agile software development method) method applied to construct houses in our country, a very special houses based on ideas of Cesar Pelli (a well known argentine architect who create things like "¨Petrora Towers"). That project was awarded by some institutions including the PMI.
Network:678



Sergio

You started by saying "@Mounir, just a brief comment. You can use Agile with waterfall life cycle process life cycle." That is not using Agile Methods --- it is using some aspects of agility.

n regard to the housing project, are you talking about building a community one house at a time (this is normal practice in any community development project). Or, are you talking about using Agile to design & build each house?

If it is the latter, then I would love to hear the details on how that was done.
...
1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Oct 27, 2017 5:32 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
...
Yes, you are right. That is not using agile based methods. Is to implement agile practice with an specific life cycle process. About the project to build houses, we use DSDM for the whole process. The construction activities (the physical activities) are sequential in essence and we tried to apply agile practices as far as we can . The point here is to take the definition of agile: it is a way of thinking and behave with focus on client and quality. When agile is implementing then you gain into agility which is the ability to answer environmental stimuli and creating environmental stimuli (this second part makes the difference with Lean). Those are not my definitions. So, unfortunatelly for people like me that are hired for companies to help implmenting Agile, there are a lot of confusion outside there and I have to spend time to explain to those people that Agile is not what they think it is. It is not deliver faster, it is not following incremental process, it is not less documentation, it is not cost optimization, and lot of other things. Returning to last Jeff Sutherland book, that is what he tried to explain in the book (while I am not saying that I agree in all things Mr Sutherland said).
Network:1337



@Vincent: if you are talking about methods based on agile principles only, then you can find a lot into the internet. First of all, former agile software development methods becomes solution delivery methods, mainly Scrum and DSDM. Then you can use those methods to create any solution (I did that) I was part of the authors of DSDM where I worked with two of the Minifesto creators and time ago I was part of reviewers. Second, most of the people forget that Scrum is a framework, not a method. Then you can fill it with anything best fits for your initiative. This years I participated into a workshop performed by Jeff Sutherland regarding his new book "The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time" where he explained (with practice) how to create non software products (an airplane for the USA Airforce for example). It was a one week workshop with lot of examples. Third, you can use Scrum for some parts of the life cycle and waterfall into others. For example, you can take a look at SAP Agile Life Cycle. No matter it is to implement and ERP to see the approach it is interesting (I have to use it to implement SAP).
Page: 1 2 3 next>  

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

"It's no coincidence that in no known language does the phrase "As pretty as an airport" appear."

- Douglas Adams

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors