Critical Chain

last edited by: Rich Gargas on Mar 1, 2018 4:13 PM login/register to edit this page


The "Critical Chain" of a project is the longest chain of tasks taking into account both predecessor/successor relationships and resource leveling.

An intended outcome of the Critical Chain method is to use "focused duration" task estimates, where time safety is omitted. That "removed safety" is accumulated into a "buffer" and placed at the end of the project plan. Project schedule performance is then measured by comparing the % project complete vs. the % of buffer consumed with each update (compared to Earned Value Management or milestone performance in Critical Path Analysis). Non-critical tasks are strategically scheduled in a way to protect the Critical Chain.

Critical Chain can be viewed as an evolution of PERT and Critical Path Analysis. Critical Chain acknowledges resource constraints, accounting for them by resource leveling. The resulting Critical Chain (and secondary chains) provide clear task priorities and encourages focused effort by the constraining resources. The use of focused duration estimates and buffer provides a more pragmatic method of managing project uncertainty than attempting to estimate the safety required for every task.


last edited by: Rich Gargas on Mar 1, 2018 4:13 PM login/register to edit this page


Reviews (1)

Login/join to subscribe
ADVERTISEMENTS

"Man is a game-playing animal, and a computer is another way to play games."

- Scott Adams

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors