Scrum

last edited by: Alexandre Costa on Aug 23, 2019 6:29 AM login/register to edit this page

Contents
1 Scrum Overview
2 Scrum Ceremonies
3 Scrum Artifacts

Scrum Overview

Scrum (n): A framework within which people can address complex adaptive problems, while productively and creatively delivering products of the highest possible value.

Scrum is:

  • Lightweight
  • Simple to understand
  • Difficult to master

  • Scrum is an agile way to manage a project, usually software development. Agile software development with Scrum is often perceived as a methodology; but rather than viewing Scrum as methodology, think of it as a framework for managing a process.

    Scrum is a framework within which people can address complex adaptive problems, while productively and creatively delivering products of the highest possible value.

    Scrum relies on a self-organizing, cross-functional team. The scrum team is self-organizing in that there is no overall team leader who decides which person will do which task or how a problem will be solved. Those are issues that are decided by the team as a whole.

    And in Scrum, a team is cross-functional, meaning everyone is needed to take a feature from idea to implementation.

    The essence of Scrum is a small team of people. The individual team is highly flexible and adaptive. These strengths continue operating in single, several, many, and networks of teams that develop, release, operate and sustain the work and work products of thousands of people. They collaborate and interoperate through sophisticated development architectures and target release environments.

    Within agile development, Scrum teams are supported by two specific roles. The first is a ScrumMaster, who can be thought of as a coach for the team, helping team members use the Scrum process to perform at the highest level.

    The product owner (PO) is the other role, and in Scrum software development, represents the business, customers or users, and guides the team toward building the right product.


    Scrum Ceremonies

    Agile software development is a fuzzy term that encompasses everything that’s not waterfall software development; waterfall being a multi month cycle of planning-developing-testing with discreet stages. Scrum is a specific, iterative way of doing agile.

    Scrum is composed of several scrum ceremonies:

  • Planning
  • Daily standup
  • Review or demo
  • Retrospective

Scrum Artifacts

provide key information that the Scrum Team and the stakeholders need to be aware of for understanding the product under development, the activities being planned, and the activities done in the project. The following artifacts are defined in Scrum Process Framework.

  • Product Vision
  • Sprint Goal
  • Product Backlog
  • Sprint Backlog
  • Definition of Done
  • Burn-Down Chart
  • Increment
  • Other required artifacts

Source: i) Schwaber, K., & Sutherland, J. (What is Scrum? [http://www.scrum.org/resources/what-is-scrum] ii) Cohn, M. (n.d.). Scrum Methodology and Project Management. [https://www.mountaingoatsoftware.com/agile/scrum]


last edited by: Alexandre Costa on Aug 23, 2019 6:29 AM login/register to edit this page


Reviews (8)

Login/join to subscribe
ADVERTISEMENTS

"Consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative."

- Oscar Wilde

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors

Vendor Events

See all Vendor Events