Project Management

Disruption Demand: Dealing with the New and Unknown

Kevin Coleman is a highly skilled senior level project and program manager/advisor with experience leading projects with labor budgets ranging from a few hundred thousand dollars to multi-million dollar budgets across multiple industries.

A challenge awaits all of us who are program and project managers. The challenge is dealing with initiatives involving the new and unknown of emerging technologies—and the threat of disruption.

Ettienne Reinecke, CTO at Japanese technology company NTT, discussed the company’s recently released report that identified what they believe to be the digital disruption coming in 2020. In that report, one of the top trends identified was “Applied technology explodes to bridge the digital and physical.” Clearly, organizations have just begun to identify the associated issues and opportunities—and estimate the scale, scope, possible disruption and overall impact of new and unknown emerging technologies. Most are in the very early stage of researching and crafting their response.

Accenture researched and conducted analysis of 3,269 companies across 20 industries and 98 industry segments for their 2019 Disruptability Index. That analysis produced some very interesting findings—one of which was that 93% of executives said that “they know their industry will be disrupted at some point in the next five years, and a mere 20% feel they’re highly prepared to address it.”

It is highly likely that many of these organizations will launch a number of initiatives that they require/demand for accelerated completion of their efforts to …


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