Project Management

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Topics: Energy and Utilities, Government, New Practitioners
Looking for ideas on how to introduce very basic project management concepts to people given the responsibilty of PjM without guidance/training.
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Kelley Neal Enterprise Project Manager| City of Naperville Lisle, Il, USA
After a career as a project manager in the telecom development world, I moved to work in city government to manage IT projects. With minimal resources available, people from the utility or public safety organizations are asked to project manage their own projects. Most of the time, these folks have no background or guidance on what it really means to project manage any project. I'm trying to pull together some guidelines or resources for folks that get anointed project managers to give them very basic tools to help them succeed. If you have any suggestions or ideas on ways to simplify something like a project plan, I'm all ears. Thank you for your help!
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Sergio Luis Conte Helping to create solutions for everyone| Worldwide based Organizations Buenos Aires, Argentina
I worked in this domain. My recommendation: do what adds value to this people. Forget the formality and put focus on creating things that minimize the risks related to do not create the solution they are waiting for. For example, perhaps you do not need a project plan (a document) but you need a piece of paper to state needs and translate it into solution requirements, you need a piece of paper with a list of "what if" (risk), etc, etc
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1 reply by Kelley Neal
May 20, 2021 4:20 PM
Kelley Neal
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Thank you for your thoughts!
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Kelley Neal Enterprise Project Manager| City of Naperville Lisle, Il, USA
May 20, 2021 3:36 PM
Replying to Sergio Luis Conte
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I worked in this domain. My recommendation: do what adds value to this people. Forget the formality and put focus on creating things that minimize the risks related to do not create the solution they are waiting for. For example, perhaps you do not need a project plan (a document) but you need a piece of paper to state needs and translate it into solution requirements, you need a piece of paper with a list of "what if" (risk), etc, etc
Thank you for your thoughts!
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Kiron Bondale
Community Champion
Mentor| World Class Productivity Inc. Welland, Ontario, Canada
Kelley -

PMI does have a number of basic learning resources for those who are new to project management. The following resource for high school students might be a good option: https://pmief.org/library/resources/projec...ab-introduction

Kiron
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1 reply by Kelley Neal
May 20, 2021 5:08 PM
Kelley Neal
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Thank you Kiron - this looks promising! :)
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Kelley Neal Enterprise Project Manager| City of Naperville Lisle, Il, USA
May 20, 2021 4:53 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
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Kelley -

PMI does have a number of basic learning resources for those who are new to project management. The following resource for high school students might be a good option: https://pmief.org/library/resources/projec...ab-introduction

Kiron
Thank you Kiron - this looks promising! :)
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Verónica Elizabeth Pozo Ruiz
Community Champion
RYLAI Access Control Quito, Pichincha, Ecuador
Check this link of an online course from PMI: https://www.pmi.org/shop/p-/elearning/proj...beginners/16183
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Keith Novak Tukwila, Wa, USA
I agree with Sergio and would add a bit of clarification. Although often misused, the terms "value added" or "non-value added" actually refer to whether the customer would pay more for that activity/feature. In this case your customer is the managers to which the PMs report. Quality control for example certainly provides value in general, but your customers expect you to provide a product without errors, rather than paying more for a working product.

Some PMs (especially new ones) will try to use every tool in their toolbox because they can. You need to focus on "Just Enough PM" as your starting point. Understand what your stakeholders want managed. That's what they're paying you for.

Schedule is usually important (but not always), and many project contributors often don't see how they affect the overall schedule, so it is usually something we must manage. Cost may be outside our view, but man-hours may be used as a proxy or be necessary for planning staffing levels. Providing status may be just presenting data without interpretation, or you may be expected to assess risk levels.

To get to the basics of your organization, understand your sponsors and stakeholders needs, and focus on what would be considered "value added" for PMs to manage from their perspective.
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Kelley Neal Enterprise Project Manager| City of Naperville Lisle, Il, USA
Thank you! Helps me frame it better!

Appreciate the continued thoughts and comments!
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Abolfazl Yousefi Darestani Manager, Quality and Continuous Improvement| Hörmann-TNR Industrial Doors Newmarket, Ontario, Canada
I do agree with Sergio. Do something that they can experience the importance and benefit of PM.
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Kwiyuh Michael Wepngong Financial Management Specialist | US Peace Corps / Cameroon Yaounde, Centre, Cameroon
How basic should the training be will depend on the actual need and sector of operations
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Adela Tataru Senior Project Manager| Self Employed Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
There is a very basic intruduction here: https://kickoff.pmi.org/

and I think that is a good start even if over-simplified.
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