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Project File Structures-Baseline Template
I am seeking advice and a good baseline file structure (taxonomy) for organizing and standardizing my organizations projects. This would in turn flow up to the programs and portfolio levels. The Project Document Management structure would encompass the inputs, tools & techniques and outputs for the five (5) process groups. (PMI based structure)

I don't want to reinvent something that already exists but will create original content if necessary. I do see articles and "for pay" services. Is there a template someone can share?

A standard or best practice is perfect to start. My organization is State Government, Medicaid and IT focused. (www.scdhhs.gov) For now, we only use Waterfall, but I intend to bring in some Agile practices and hopefully introduce and implement Hybrid PM approaches.

Thanks in advance
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Your choices, Michael, will greatly depend on your project management information system. For example, I am currently using an OpenText solution which is really strong on version management but has no full-text search capability. The limitations may force you down certain structures.

I like a structure based on Project Performance Domains--formerly, knowledge areas.
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1 reply by Michael Niermeier
Feb 10, 2022 4:01 PM
Michael Niermeier
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I will look into literature on the Project Performance Domains. Have not heard those terms before esp. In this context.
Michael -

The challenge with any type of document filing structure is that folks will use it inconsistently. I'd start off with a very simple, limited set of folders and see how people adapt to that before going more detailed.

The same holds true if you are looking at a knowledge repository platform such as a wiki.

As long as file/text search capabilities are good, it shouldn't matter how the documents are organized. That is one more example of letting a team figure out their way of working...

Kiron
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1 reply by Michael Niermeier
Feb 10, 2022 3:59 PM
Michael Niermeier
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Definitely need to keep it simple and get user feedback before launch.
Michael,

I found this helpful, and it might fit to your environment
https://its.ny.gov/nys-project-management-guidebook-release-2
and this
https://cdt.ca.gov/policy/

Thomas
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1 reply by Michael Niermeier
Feb 10, 2022 3:57 PM
Michael Niermeier
...
Dänke. I will take a look at those links.
I would suggest starting by looking for WBS templates and SEMP (Systems Engineering Management Plan) templates for your knowledge domain.

Most people think of SE as IT, but really it is about complex systems in general, and developing taxonomies is a subset of how to define those systems. A WBS is a taxonomy for how the work is broken down (PMI uses the term differently than the original terminology). A SEMP is a plan for how the work will be planned and executed, including your processes and tools.

They may be organized in different ways such as by product decomposition, project phase, etc. and some taxonomies will fit better than others. Many technical domains have existing bodies of knowledge have these kind of templates that cover just about any work you could imagine. You can tailor that down to what you need now, and perhaps a better future state.

As an example, for an electronics project (new to me at the time) I found the IEEE SEMP template, and whittled the 20+ pages of outline down to the few I actually needed, and not only did I have a taxonomy, but it was consistent with the industry standards. While you probably won't need all the product definition parts, the process structure organization may be of value as a reference.
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1 reply by Michael Niermeier
Feb 10, 2022 3:56 PM
Michael Niermeier
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That is a great idea. I was thinking about using a WBS initially but did not think that would make sense. I will give it a review. Will also check out what SE has to offer. Thanks
Feb 10, 2022 1:33 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
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I would suggest starting by looking for WBS templates and SEMP (Systems Engineering Management Plan) templates for your knowledge domain.

Most people think of SE as IT, but really it is about complex systems in general, and developing taxonomies is a subset of how to define those systems. A WBS is a taxonomy for how the work is broken down (PMI uses the term differently than the original terminology). A SEMP is a plan for how the work will be planned and executed, including your processes and tools.

They may be organized in different ways such as by product decomposition, project phase, etc. and some taxonomies will fit better than others. Many technical domains have existing bodies of knowledge have these kind of templates that cover just about any work you could imagine. You can tailor that down to what you need now, and perhaps a better future state.

As an example, for an electronics project (new to me at the time) I found the IEEE SEMP template, and whittled the 20+ pages of outline down to the few I actually needed, and not only did I have a taxonomy, but it was consistent with the industry standards. While you probably won't need all the product definition parts, the process structure organization may be of value as a reference.
That is a great idea. I was thinking about using a WBS initially but did not think that would make sense. I will give it a review. Will also check out what SE has to offer. Thanks
Feb 10, 2022 11:57 AM
Replying to Thomas Walenta
...
Michael,

I found this helpful, and it might fit to your environment
https://its.ny.gov/nys-project-management-guidebook-release-2
and this
https://cdt.ca.gov/policy/

Thomas
Dänke. I will take a look at those links.
Feb 10, 2022 11:48 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Michael -

The challenge with any type of document filing structure is that folks will use it inconsistently. I'd start off with a very simple, limited set of folders and see how people adapt to that before going more detailed.

The same holds true if you are looking at a knowledge repository platform such as a wiki.

As long as file/text search capabilities are good, it shouldn't matter how the documents are organized. That is one more example of letting a team figure out their way of working...

Kiron
Definitely need to keep it simple and get user feedback before launch.
Feb 10, 2022 11:34 AM
Replying to Stéphane Parent
...
Your choices, Michael, will greatly depend on your project management information system. For example, I am currently using an OpenText solution which is really strong on version management but has no full-text search capability. The limitations may force you down certain structures.

I like a structure based on Project Performance Domains--formerly, knowledge areas.
I will look into literature on the Project Performance Domains. Have not heard those terms before esp. In this context.
...
1 reply by Stéphane Parent
Feb 10, 2022 4:45 PM
Stéphane Parent
...
Check out the PMBOK Guide, 7th edition, Michael. In previous editions, they were called knowledge areas. (Knowledge areas are still a good way to structure your project management information system.)
Feb 10, 2022 4:01 PM
Replying to Michael Niermeier
...
I will look into literature on the Project Performance Domains. Have not heard those terms before esp. In this context.
Check out the PMBOK Guide, 7th edition, Michael. In previous editions, they were called knowledge areas. (Knowledge areas are still a good way to structure your project management information system.)

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