Project Management

Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Topics: Agile, Consulting, Strategy
For an Art Project should I go Waterfall, Hybrid or Agile?
Anonymous
I want to begin a startup, mainly for my hobbies, the start up would be an online Gallery for handmade Jewelry and home accessories, which approach would you recommend, Waterfall, Hybrid, Agile?
Sort By:
Page: 1 2 next>
A good question although I am not qualified in art details because I am not an artist. My tip would be it depends on the art piece if you are doing different types of art. Focus on experiential learning and simply start practicing if it is a hobby of yours. Over time you should pick up on which approaches work best and tailor each to suit the specific art piece. Hope this helps
Anonymous
I am currently going by the same as your advice, it feels prolonged than it should be, so i thought of asking, Thank you for your advice.
...
1 reply by Stephen Robin
Mar 16, 2022 6:08 AM
Stephen Robin
...
How long has it been since you started? The process isn't instantaneous so it will take some time. The actual time versus how it feels can cause some level of cognitive conflict. Another question, are you doing multiple art pieces or one at a time?
Mar 16, 2022 5:42 AM
Replying to anonymous
...
I am currently going by the same as your advice, it feels prolonged than it should be, so i thought of asking, Thank you for your advice.
How long has it been since you started? The process isn't instantaneous so it will take some time. The actual time versus how it feels can cause some level of cognitive conflict. Another question, are you doing multiple art pieces or one at a time?
...
1 reply by anonymous
Mar 16, 2022 6:29 AM
anonymous
...
It have been nearly 3 months since I started dedicating time for it, so you are right I shouldn't consider the irregular unfocused period a part of the project. I work on different pieces at the same time as prototypes, Each prototype require different tools and materials.
The thing is didn't even start a business case to see if it is of value or not, saying that out loud now I realize I am skipping important parts of the process.
Discussions help, Thank you..
Anonymous
Mar 16, 2022 6:08 AM
Replying to Stephen Robin
...
How long has it been since you started? The process isn't instantaneous so it will take some time. The actual time versus how it feels can cause some level of cognitive conflict. Another question, are you doing multiple art pieces or one at a time?
It have been nearly 3 months since I started dedicating time for it, so you are right I shouldn't consider the irregular unfocused period a part of the project. I work on different pieces at the same time as prototypes, Each prototype require different tools and materials.
The thing is didn't even start a business case to see if it is of value or not, saying that out loud now I realize I am skipping important parts of the process.
Discussions help, Thank you..
...
1 reply by Stephen Robin
Mar 16, 2022 7:38 AM
Stephen Robin
...
Yes, I recommend you do a draft for the business case in physical writing or an online document or both.

Also, don't spread yourself too thin. Have a defined scope of what you plan to do for the 6-12 months instead of starting a new art piece every time you get a new idea.

Thomas also gave some solid advice with clear points.

Best of luck in your endeavours!
Think you can compare your question to 'should I paint the walls brown or yellow?'. Maybe you find an answer but it is not really relevant for your purpose.

And in the case of agile vs waterfall the answer is always hybrid, which means you do whatever is suited for the current situation and follow a wider purpose, goals and roadmap.

As a startup, there is a lot of advice what to do in the beginning and later once you survived. The beginning should focus on finding engaged customers/champions, not creating a product out of your imagination. The champions will tell you what they need, like and expect from you. From there you can go. A good read is Steve Blank's 'The four steps to epiphany'.

Good luck.
Thomas
...
1 reply by anonymous
Mar 20, 2022 3:00 AM
anonymous
...
Thank you very much, a similar advice of was given to me a while back in a more casual way, he just said "They want Cumin, bring Cumin". I will look up the book and read it.
Mar 16, 2022 6:29 AM
Replying to anonymous
...
It have been nearly 3 months since I started dedicating time for it, so you are right I shouldn't consider the irregular unfocused period a part of the project. I work on different pieces at the same time as prototypes, Each prototype require different tools and materials.
The thing is didn't even start a business case to see if it is of value or not, saying that out loud now I realize I am skipping important parts of the process.
Discussions help, Thank you..
Yes, I recommend you do a draft for the business case in physical writing or an online document or both.

Also, don't spread yourself too thin. Have a defined scope of what you plan to do for the 6-12 months instead of starting a new art piece every time you get a new idea.

Thomas also gave some solid advice with clear points.

Best of luck in your endeavours!
Startups can benefit from an adaptive approach if you wish to test the viability of either your business offering OR the approach to deliver that offering. Eric Ries's book The Lean Startup is a good grounder in that approach.

Aside from that, no two projects are the same within any domain or industry. An adaptive approach might work for one whereas a predictive approach would work for another. The key is to "profile" your project's context to determine where along the continuum from 100% predictive to 100% adaptive does your project fall.

PMI's Agile Practice Guide provides some guidance for such profiling, and the Disciplined Agile toolkit also provides a flowchart to help with the decisioning around life cycle approaches.

Kiron
...
1 reply by anonymous
Mar 20, 2022 3:06 AM
anonymous
...
Another recommendation for a book with good reviews, much appreciated, I am currently checking the Agile practice guide for more understanding, Thank you for your advice.
It depends on a lot of factors. Kiron and Thomas made valid points.
Kiron and Thomas made spot on points.

I believe, a good approach to test the waters for a new startup would be a Hybrid Approach.
In a case like yours, I would consider a hybrid approach essential. The project planning and the gallery to display the projects are two different animals, and there are typically different people creating the content to display, and gallery itself.

For my own projects, I need some type of waterfall planning because there are absolutely dependencies that need to be actively managed in order to meet deadlines The insides need to be done before the outsides can enclose them. Some things need to cure or dry resulting in idle time. If I need materials, special tools, etc. they must be planned in advance. I am constantly working with my own network diagrams to ensure I have considered my critical path and can manage my time effectively. Not everything goes as planned so I often find myself re-planning short duration activities, and including incremental and iterative updates/improvements.

Website development is a natural fit for agile approaches. You don't need perfection to start and can add functionality as you grow. You could start with off the shelf eCommerce platforms until you learn your own requirements as the sales portal customer, and then transition to your own site where you accept the IT costs, but avoid the 3rd party fees.
...
1 reply by anonymous
Mar 20, 2022 3:15 AM
anonymous
...
Thank you, thank you... you just explained the process the way I see it, mine is just entangled a little bit, and again you agree with the other PMs on the hybrid approach, a waterfall for what is practiced and known, and agile for what is new and not well defined yet.
Page: 1 2 next>  

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

"Judge a man by his questions rather than his answers."

- Voltaire

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors