Project Management

Agile Manifesto

last edited by: Syed Arshad Ali Ahmed on Oct 28, 2020 6:16 AM login/register to edit this page
Keywords: Agile Planning Knowledge and Skills PMI-ACP Volunteer Opportunity


In 2001, a group of thought leaders in the software industry (Kent Beck Mike Beedle,Arie van Bennekum,Alistair Cockburn,Ward Cunningham,Martin Fowler,James Grenning,Jim Highsmith,Andrew Hunt,Ron Jeffries,Jon Kern,Brian Marick,Robert C. Martin,Steve Mellor,Ken Schwaber,Jeff Sutherland,Dave Thomas) created the Manifesto for Agile Software Development aka Agile Manifesto and formalized the Agile movement.

They came up with four core values to build better software:

"We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value:

1-Individuals and interactions over processes and tools

2-Working software over comprehensive documentation

3-Customer collaboration over contract negotiation

4-Responding to change over following a plan

That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more."

These twelve principles of agile development are what followed:

1-Customer satisfaction through early and continuous software delivery

2-Accommodate changing requirements throughout the development process

3-Frequent delivery of working software

4-Collaboration between the business stakeholders and developers throughout the project

5-Support, trust, and motivate the people involved

6-Enable face-to-face interactions

7-Working software is the primary measure of progress

8-Agile processes to support a consistent development pace

9-Attention to technical detail and design enhances agility

10-Simplicity

11-Skilled and motivated team members who have decision-making power

12-Regular reflections on how to become more effective

Criticism:

A common criticism of this practice is that the time spent attempting to learn and implement the practice is too costly, despite potential benefits. A transition from traditional management to Agile management requires total submission to Agile and a firm commitment from all members of the organization to seeing the process through. Issues like unequal results across the organization, too much change for employees’ ability to handle, or a lack of guarantees at the end of the transformation are just a few examples.


last edited by: Syed Arshad Ali Ahmed on Oct 28, 2020 6:16 AM login/register to edit this page


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