Project Management

Are Your Communication Habits Good Enough?

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By Marian Haus

About 75-90 percent of a project manager’s time is spent formally or informally communicating, according to PMI’s Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (aka, PMBOK). No surprise, then, how much communication is linked to project success.

PMI’s latest Pulse of the Profession report, published this month, reveals that up to a third of surveyed project managers identify inadequate or poor communication as a cause of project failure. A Towers Watson survey conducted in 2012 showed that companies emphasizing effective communication practices are 1.7 times more likely to succeed financially than their peers.

So what can project managers and organizations do to improve communication and hence drive success? Here are six good habits.

  1. Acknowledge and accept the need for active, clear and transparent communication as a key ingredient for project success.
  1. Establish a simple and transparent communication framework. This means agreeing on who communicates what, to whom, when and how. For instance, a team member might communicate the project’s internal and external technical matters (the “what”), while the project manager will communicate the project status (the “what” again) for various audiences (“whom”).

    The communication time frame and frequency (“when”) will depend on the communicated message and the targeted audience. The communication tools (“how”) could range from project status slides delivered via email to status updates exchanged on the project’s internal websites.

  1. Invest in communication, presentation and other related soft skills. Above all, the project manager has to be a confident communicator. Strengthening communication skills might be especially required if the project manager grew into the role from a more technical position.
  1. Encourage project managers and teams to communicate openly and proactively regardless of whether the message is positive or negative. Especially when things go wrong, communicating issues early and transparently can mean more for the organization than solving the issues itself.
  1. Put emphasis on the quality and effectiveness of communications. Communicating frequently and with the appropriate tools is not enough. Effective and high-quality communication means delivering the appropriate message in a simple and articulate manner and to the right stakeholders. For instance, within the project team you might use a detailed and technical communication approach. But when communicating (to management and sponsors), you will have to simplify your message.
  1. Last but not least, communication isn’t only about speaking, reporting and asking. Communication also means time spent listening to what others have to say.  

How much time do you estimate you spend communicating? What best practices can you share?

 

 

Posted by Marian Haus on: February 25, 2016 02:53 PM | Permalink

Comments (8)

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George Lewis Program/Project Manager| DXC Technology Company Heredia, Costa Rica
There is always more room for improvement...

mdfletcher
Not only is a lot of time spent on communicating status, issues, etc, but another part of communication is follow up. It seems that having the ability to elicit a commitment to communication from team members can save a lot of time by getting needed information on a timely basis, instead of continuously following up with team members and not even necessarily getting the information needed.

tarmizee
good communication skill is also important to keep motivating team member

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fosco frongia Senior project manager| ENTE PATRIMONIALE CHIESA GESU' CRISTO SUG Fino Mornasco, Como, Italy
thanks for the article, very effective communication!

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PANKAJ KUMAR JOSHI Deputy General Manager| Transrail Lighting Limited Nainital, Uttrakhand, India
Communication is essential in project leadership.

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Marius Oprea Bucharest, Romania, Romania
Big LIKE!


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Mario Ricardo Mireles Calderón Project Management and Commercial Leader - Peru Office| STANTEC Consulting Arequipa, Peru
Comunication in all aspects...
A real framework

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Ahmad Tarmizee Kamarul Zaman Manager| ABeam Consulting (M) Sdn Bhd Shah Alam,, Selangor, Malaysia
The selection of good word during communication also very important

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