3 Tips For Assuming an Existing Project

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As a project manager, there’s perhaps nothing better than starting a new project. With it comes a fresh start and the promise of a successful conclusion. To me, it’s akin to starting a new year in school with new notebooks, where nothing has been written to spoil the fresh sheets of paper.

 

However, as we become more experienced as project managers, we’re called on more and more to assume control of a project already in motion. This might be triggered by a happy event, such as a promotion for the existing project manager, or a less-than-happy situation, such as a lack of progress on the project.

 

Assuming responsibility for a project that has already launched is a lot different than starting from the beginning. You won’t have the benefit of starting with a clean sheet of paper, and there will be things you need to do—and undo.

 

Here are three tips I always follow when assuming control of an existing project:

 

1. Assume Nothing    

When starting a new project, you have the opportunity to perform mobilization and initiation activities to effectively set the project on a path to success. In addition, there are some early checkpoints where you can perform structured control actions to further assure the proper trajectory of the project.  

While the existing project status reports can show the assumed disposition of a project, they may not reveal essential missing activities needed for project success. For example, an existing project might not have had the benefit of a thorough mobilization and initiation effort to properly set its course. In addition, there may be hidden or under-mitigated risks, emerging issues, stakeholder challenges and hidden dependencies that have not yet come to light. 

When taking over an existing project, the first thing I do is review it in the same way I would a new project. Introducing a pause in project activities to perform a “soft reset” allows both confirmation of assumptions and validation of project progress.

In addition, this activity can reveal unseen factors that put the current project position in doubt. This is a good time to reforecast the remaining work. By assuming nothing about the project, the “soft reset” serves as a basis to properly transition the project towards success.

 

2. Match the Team to the Realistic Remaining Work  

One of the most important facets of a soft reset is reforecasting the amount of remaining work. Use the existing forecast as a foundation for considering other factors that may influence the future progress of the project. These may include effort, scheduling conflicts (e.g., year-end holidays), upcoming business process changes and technology-readiness dependencies. 

From the reforecast, compare these factors against the capacity and capabilities of the existing project team. Review whether you have the requisite skills and team members available for each phase of the project. In addition, consider the availability of key resources who cannot be readily substituted in case they are not able to work on the project. This examination of project resources by phase should include not only individual team members, but also team leads and third-party suppliers.

 

3. Engage More Frequently With the Most Accountable Stakeholder

While there are many inorganic components of a project, such as deliverables and status reports, often the most critical components revolve around the organic nature of people. Having strong executive sponsorship, a structured governance engagement model and open communication all enable project success.

When you are introduced as the new project manager on an existing effort, some change management work will need to be done to ensure a smooth transition.

Given the myriad stakeholders involved in a project, who should you start with? The typical consideration is to start with the most senior leadership stakeholder, who is typically also the project sponsor.

I think, however, a better place to start is with the most accountable stakeholder. This would be the person who after the project is implemented would manage the new solution to achieve the project objectives. In addition, this person would likely have the greatest knowledge of requirements and implementation considerations, which would be valuable to your soft reset.

 

Set Your Team Up for Success
When airline pilots transfer control of an aircraft to another pilot, they go through a structured process. Before control is transferred, the flying pilot does a check of instruments, course and speed. The pilot currently flying and the pilot taking over the controls exchange a distinct exchange of commands to ensure a precise transition and a safe flight.  

Assuming control of an existing project should have that same level of attention to detail and precision. Now that you are leading this existing project, be sure to consider the factors shared above that confidently allow you to say, “I have the controls.”

When assuming existing projects, what sort of activities do you perform as part of a transition? I’d welcome other thoughts to help make us all better project managers.

Posted by Kevin Korterud on: February 02, 2019 06:53 PM | Permalink

Comments (17)

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Interesting article and very useful tips.
Thanks for sharing!!

Good post.!!!
Thanks for sharing!!

same problem solving skill!!!

Thanks for your sharing. In my opinion, project assumption and constraint log is input & output of project risk assessment as well.

Good article with very valid points and tips within. On regards to the first one, "Assume nothing" one may add "(Re)validate everything". Project is handed over often with a "under control" claim, probably in an exercice to self-assure of the good work done by the leaving PM. Under project scrutinity, budget overruns or schedule slippage could be (and many times are) found. In that regards, the "assume nothing" is invariably linked to revalidating the REAL project status. For that purpose, a established process and tools are needed to ensure a successful project handover. In this regard, the incoming PM shall actually audit the project in order to carry on its execution.

Assume nothing. often difficult to do but very necessary

Hi all...thanks for the great comments....

I long for the days when I could start a nice new project!

This article had great relevance to a current project that I was handed. Initially I relied on the previous PM's work for the best solutions for implementation and project design. However, quickly I realized I needed to "cast off" those confinements and re-evaluate the entire project and all of the phases. Great article, wish I would've been able to read this months ago when I started!

Excellent, very interesting and very helpful, thank you very much for sharing, success in 2019

Thanks Sharing, Very interesting and helpful

Great lesson learnt: Assume nothing !

Thanks, 3 very good tips.

Thanks for the great article

Great article. In my professional career I was often in this situation and, in general, I realized that the sponsors and some stakeholders tended to be lighter than normal about the real problems of the project. They detailed some small complications and some lack of confidence in the whole team. And yes, they explained about other problems but they always add the word "small" first.
These three tips are real and very useful, and I add a fourth "risk re-calibration".
Thanks for sharing.

Very happy everyone is enjoying this article....Eduardo...yes indeed re-calibration of risks should be part of the transition as its likely a lack of rigor in this area would lead to someone else assuming a project team

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