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Topics: Information Technology, PMO
Program Management Templates?
Network:263



Newly starting a program manager and looking for others' templates around the following areas:

-Vendor SOW deliverable tracking
-Status reporting
-Financial reporting

Our PMO is very immature in terms of program management so we're defining these things now.
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Network:159



There's lots of templates out there. You should check around the company (outside of PMO) and see if your legal or contract teams have any OPAs on this.

In a nutshell, you may want to consider the following.

Vendor SOW...MSA or Contract in to govern the agreements +
Phases, Deliverable list and format of the deliverable, Roles and Responsibilities for the deliverable, including due dates.

Status reporting... I would be surprised if your PMO doesn't have a template, but essentially there are a few key things here. Health (GYR) of the program or project, why GYR, Key milestones or phase gates, upcoming milestones, on plan or off plan, % through the program, project, workstream, and risks, issues.

Finance... What did we budget and what are we spending? Are we on track to spend less than or more than budgeted? Why?
Network:939



Hi Keith, if you type templates into the search engine here, a whole plethora are available for your perusal, good luck with your search.
Network:2433



I'd first ensure there are not any available templates within the organization, or at least completed versions to start from. Aside from that option, this community and a general web search will provide some results to get you started.
Network:219



Hi Keith, you can search for templates on this platform, others or internally. However, you will still have to adapt those to your specific needs.
Templates can give you a good starting point, more important is what do you want to track, what the steering committee, sponsor, client, etc. want to see. And you have to adjust the templates to the target group/people. And of course the presented information need to be understandable by the target groups. If it is a status template to be presented to sponsor, client or steering committee, is should present the status on a very high level, and always have proposed measures with dates and responsible people in case of deviations from the approved plan

I developed in the past project review status template, where all PMs had to provide in addition contract(s) overview (external customers and subcontractors). We went through all details of the contractual obligations of other parties and ours of course (mostly financial ones - liabilities, penalties, warranty, ...), and it was interesting to discover that PMs did not know the contracts of their projects. But they started to look into them. And started reporting legal risks.

All this is to say that it is important what you need to report or reflect in your templates.

I can share some of the templates I have implemented, you can send me a personal message.
Network:365



I completely agree with Milena. Despite the wide availability of many types of templates, you are unlikely to find as specific one that fits precisely what you need, and trying to use their format for your own application without significant customization probably don't work.

I tend to look at multiple different templates before creating my own format. Sometimes specific aspects of a template may directly apply to my need, but more often, I find common themes or organizational styles that I can use for my purpose even though the subject of the original template was for a different purpose.

You're usually better off first figuring out the purpose of your material and what value it provides to the audience, and then looking at templates to get ideas on how to present what you wanted to communicate. That's likely to produce better results than using the templates of others to tell you what your key points should be.

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