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Documenting MS Access Database for a Project
Network:28



I have been requested to document a MS Access DB that is used bi-annually and will be replaced by new software only next year. The employee that used to use the DB is no longer here. Before the client can provide business requirements, they requested I document what the DB has and how it works with specifics.

The vendor for the new software understands the high-level process they are replacing though they do not know the specific details required for the process to be completed.

The MS Access Documentation tools can provide the data tables and queries but those reports are very basic.Is there a good resource that would assist with this task?
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Network:29



As a project manager and a MS Access developer I have a unique perspective. You can tell a lot about how the data is organized by going under "Database Tools" tab and reviewing the "Relationships". If you could find within your organization a DB developer - access or sql they might be able to explain the significance of some of the relationships like one to many versus one to one.

Another thought would be to look for queries that are not for reporting but inside for updating the data or performing some sort of analysis like looking for duplicates or overriding information. Not knowing anything about this database or the data inside it is difficult to assist. Hopefully, you'll be able to find a resource within your organization to give you some assistance, and once you have some details a resource at the client should be able to provide the next level of clarification. Good Luck!
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1 reply by Ilona Daw-Krizman
Apr 09, 2018 10:43 PM
Ilona Daw-Krizman
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These are great ideas. I can pull in some BAs to assist.
Network:28



Apr 09, 2018 10:43 AM
Replying to Mary Sullivan
...
As a project manager and a MS Access developer I have a unique perspective. You can tell a lot about how the data is organized by going under "Database Tools" tab and reviewing the "Relationships". If you could find within your organization a DB developer - access or sql they might be able to explain the significance of some of the relationships like one to many versus one to one.

Another thought would be to look for queries that are not for reporting but inside for updating the data or performing some sort of analysis like looking for duplicates or overriding information. Not knowing anything about this database or the data inside it is difficult to assist. Hopefully, you'll be able to find a resource within your organization to give you some assistance, and once you have some details a resource at the client should be able to provide the next level of clarification. Good Luck!
These are great ideas. I can pull in some BAs to assist.

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