Do we need a Project Management Office aka The PMO

From the Project Management in Real Life Blog
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Sharing my Project Management adventures and some tips. I try to keep my articles brief and to the point. Project Management is an Art, Science, and Discipline.

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The main reason PMO's are not setup is the time and investment it takes to set it up right. The current focus is get the project done now. With that type of approach you are exposed to potential problems as soon as you start the project. The PMO might be looked at like a guardian watching over us and slowing us down with red tape. 

A PMO is a big investment that takes time to evolve into the right tailored fit that meets the companies needs. A PMO will alway's be a work in progress that needs to be continually tuned to maintain it's value. The company will achieve a ROI by delivering projects on-time and controlling the project budget and scope. Management buy in and patience is required to setup your PMO. Be willing to suffer growing pains along the way it will be worth it in the end. Management will have a "Stop Light Report" showing the status of all the projects being worked on in the company using green, yellow and red to indicate the health of the project with a brief summary of the progress being made.

Start slow using the "Project Management Body of Knowledge aka PMBOK" the book of standards to guide you on managing projects. Review all your current processes and standards. Get together with all the Project Managers to agree upon a standard to be followed by everyone. Just think if you have no PMO and three Project Managers you will have three methods on running a project. It might work now, but as your projects get more complex you need to have all your project managers following a standard guideline allowing them some deviations. 

The goal is tracking your projects to deliver them on-time within the budget. Project Management is an Art and Science don't make it so complicated to implement in your company. Keep it simple and evolve with time so everyone can get onboard and not be frightened of it. 

What I look for in a Project Manager:

- Continually improving processes

- Willing to jump in and help

- Cool under pressure

- Keeping your word

- The Quarterback

- Never give up

- Approachable

- Dragon Slayer

- Learner for life

- Good listener

- Leadership

- Thick skin

- Charisma

- Follow up 

- Tenacity

- Teacher

- No Fear

- Humble

- Friend 

I can add more, but I will stop here. You get the point I'm making.

 

(Note - this article was originally written by Drake Settsu and published on DrakeSettsu.BlogSpot.com in February 2018)

Posted on: February 08, 2018 06:26 AM | Permalink

Comments (7)

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Do you prefer to work in an Organization with a PMO?
I have a poll going - https://www.projectmanagement.com/polls/436772/Do-you-prefer-to-work-in-an-Organization-with-a-PMO-

Cast your vote if you have not voted yet.

Great! I like the idea of keep it simple and evolve as you go.
I think most of business owners refuse to implement the PMO system because of the density of standardization and complication.

Thanks Omar!

Good insights, Drake and thanks for sharing.
PMO is always an asset to an organization because it reduce risks on projects by incorporating best practices. But instead of adding value to organization it should not be a burden to PMs who are trying to get things done.

Thanks, Drake. Having a PMO creates processes for PM's to follow with consistency. Additionally, it creates cohesiveness within the PM group. I prefer it - absolutely.

Thanks Drake for this article.. Yes we need a PMO...sometimes!

Thank you Anish, Andrew & Sante for your comments.

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