The Worst Project Manager I Ever Worked For Was Me

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by Kevin Korterud

 

I always enjoy hearing about the early careers of the project managers I meet. In almost every conversation, the subject turns to when they were team members being led by a highly capable senior project manager who provided guidance in starting up, executing and sometimes turning around projects.

 

It’s also not uncommon to hear stories of the worst project manager they ever worked for. These stories, while not as glowing, also influenced their careers around what not to do. By probing a bit deeper, they offered up observations of certain behaviors that created havoc, dissatisfaction and quite often failed projects.

 

From these observations of the worst-ever project manager, I started to put together my own thoughts on who I would select for this inglorious label. After careful consideration, I arrived at the only logical choice: me. In my early years as a project manager I managed to consistently demonstrate all of the behaviors of poor project managers.   

 

Here are my votes for the most significant behaviors that led to consistently poor performance as a project manager early in my career:

 

 

  1. I Wanted the Title of “Project Manager”

 

When I was a project team member I relished the thought of one day having a business card with an impressive title of project manager. My thought being once I received that lofty title, it would allow me to be successful at whatever project I was assigned to lead. In addition, the acquisition of that title would instantly garner respect from other project managers.

 

I failed to realize that most project managers are already quite proficient at leading teams and producing results. The title comes with a heavy burden of responsibility that was exponentially greater than what I had as a project team member. As a team member, I didn’t realize how much my project manager shielded me from the sometimes unpleasant realities of projects.

 

The satisfaction of acquiring the title of project manager can be very short-lived if you’re not adequately prepared. My goal became to perform at the level at or above what the title that project manager reflected.

 

 

2. I Talked Too Much

 

Perhaps I was wrongly influenced by theater or movies where great leaders are often portrayed in time of need as delivering impressive speeches that motivate people to outstanding results. I remember quite clearly some of the meetings I led as a new project manager that quite honestly should have won me an award for impersonating a project manager.

 

Meetings were dominated by my overconfident and ill-formed views on what was going right and wrong. In addition, I also had the false notion that I had the best approach to all of the risks and issues on the project. No surprise that this mode of interaction greatly limited the size of projects I could effectively lead. Essentially, it was a project team of one.

 

After a while, I started to observe that senior project managers spent a fair portion of the time in their meetings practicing active listening. In addition, they would pause, ponder the dialogue and pose simple but effective probing questions. When I started to emulate some of these practices, it resulted in better performance that created opportunities to lead larger projects. “Less is more” became a theme that allowed me to understand the true problems and work with the team to arrive at effective mitigations.

 

  1. I Tried to Make Everyone Happy  

One of the most critical components of any project is the people that comprise the team members and stakeholders. As a new project manager, I tended to over-engage with stakeholders and team members by attempting to instantly resolve every issue, whether real or perceived. My logic was that if I removed any opportunity for dissatisfaction then project success would be assured.

I failed to realize this desire to completely please everyone quite often resulted in pleasing nobody. In addition, I also managed to pay insufficient attention to the key operational facets of a project: estimates, forecasts, metrics and other essentials needed to keep a project on track. Furthermore, the business case for the project gathered almost no consideration as I was busy trying to make everyone happy as a path to results.

Over time I began to adopt a more balanced approach that allowed me to spend the proper level of engagement with people, processes and the project business case. This balanced approach allowed me to have a broader span of control for factors that could adversely affect a project.

For all the things we have learned over the years as project managers, it sometimes causes me to wish for a time machine to go back and avoid all of the mistakes we made. But then, we would not have had the benefit of the sometimes-traumatic learning experiences that have made us the project managers that we are today.  

Did you ever consider yourself to be the worst project manager you ever worked for? I think we all were at one point in our careers.

Posted by Kevin Korterud on: August 10, 2018 06:43 PM | Permalink

Comments (33)

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I joined this site to meet project managers that I can connect with an learn from. I want to find a way to work directly under a project manager as his assistance. I am not looking to get paid I am just looking for experience working on an actual project

Thanks for sharing. There is always something to learn and adapt.

Very good article but also there more like He influence you and hurt you to keep his position, listen to the client and he don't listen to you, he through responsibilities to you...etc..

Bad PM can break all ethical and habit to keep his position!!!!

Great perspective, Kevin. Internal reflection is a healthy aspect of continued professional, and personal, growth. It's great to hear other's stories. Thank you, for sharing your story.

Good Article Kevin!

Nice sharing of experiences. Most of us have to go through such moments.

Yes indeed, we need to turn the mirror inwards occasionally.

Good view and the details on the perception of being PM.Always the project/program goals versus the available strength/Assets and weakness should be in mind to have the things get moved towards reaching the milestones and goals.

Really truthful and honest explanation where we missed in project management
Thanks for sharing!!!

Very valid and thought provoking

Thanks. That's very nice.

Good post, Kevin. Self-reflection helps us to improve & grow. Thanks.

Very good article. Thanks for sharing.

Great article! Thanks for sharing

Thanks for sharing, good post that helps to think and improve.

Yes, as you mention most of us would have been worst project managers during some point in our career, especially early part. Agreed!

Oh wow! Was definitely worth the read.Thanks for sharing your experience.I am in the early stage of my career in Project management .This comes handy

Good set of example
Looking back and introspection is what make us better!

thank you very good and honest article!

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