Project Management

A Lesson About Communication in Times of Chaos

From the Voices on Project Management Blog
by , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Voices on Project Management offers insights, tips, advice and personal stories from project managers in different regions and industries. The goal is to get you thinking, and spark a discussion. So, if you read something that you agree with--or even disagree with--leave a comment.

About this Blog

RSS

View Posts By:

Cameron McGaughy
Marian Haus
Lynda Bourne
Lung-Hung Chou
Bernadine Douglas
Conrado Morlan
Kevin Korterud
Peter Tarhanidis
Vivek Prakash
Cyndee Miller
David Wakeman
Jen Skrabak
Mario Trentim
Shobhna Raghupathy
Roberto Toledo
Joanna Newman
Christian Bisson
Linda Agyapong
Soma Bhattacharya
Jess Tayel
Rex Holmlin
Ramiro Rodrigues
Taralyn Frasqueri-Molina
Wanda Curlee

Past Contributers:

Jorge Vald├ęs Garciatorres
Hajar Hamid
Dan Goldfischer
Saira Karim
Jim De Piante
sanjay saini
Judy Umlas
Abdiel Ledesma
Michael Hatfield
Deanna Landers
Alfonso Bucero
Kelley Hunsberger
William Krebs
Peter Taylor
Rebecca Braglio
Geoff Mattie
Dmitri Ivanenko PMP ITIL

Recent Posts

Project Management Lessons From Soccer Teams

Plan for the Velocity of Change to Keep Increasing!

A Lesson About Communication in Times of Chaos

Innovation and Design Thinking, Part One

The Misunderstood Scrum Master



By Conrado Morlan

Project management practitioners know the importance of communication during the project execution, hand-off and operations stages. For each of these, the communication plan should cover all the different forms of communication and the target stakeholders.

The frequency of communication during project execution often has a defined cadence and uses different artifacts to deliver the message to stakeholders, who usually are internal.

During the operations stage, the project is usually in production and practitioners are communicating directly with customers, either internal or external. While the specifics depend on the situation, communication with customers must be regular, concise and delivered in a timely manner through the proper channels.

How Not to Communicate
As you may know from my past posts, I have been running for several years and have often thought about connections to project management. One of my running goals for 2020 is to run the Popular Brooklyn Half, the largest half marathon in the United States.

As I did not meet the pre-registration requirements, the open registration was my only option. On registration day I was ready: My account was available, all my personal information was filled out, and I had my credit card on hand. At the designated time I visited the registration website to compete for a spot with thousands of runners from across the world.

I thought I would be directed to start the registration process, but instead, I was directed to an electronic queue page. After a few minutes, my expected waiting time was listed as 25 minutes. I got a little anxious thinking that the limited number of entries would sell out in less than that time. A few minutes later, the waiting time changed to 40 minutes, then to more than an hour; all of a sudden a message about “experiencing technical difficulties” was displayed.

In the meantime, upset runners from across the world took to social media to vent their frustration and dissatisfaction. But the organizers did not acknowledge the blast of posts until three hours after the designated registration time. That’s when they posted a message stating that they were trying to figure out the problem, and if they were not able to resolve it soon, a new registration date would be announced.

That message ignited the runners, who inundated social media with posts venting their resentment.

By this time, the organizer’s website was down, and the homepage showed the “experiencing technical difficulties” message. I stayed away from the postings on social media and kept refreshing the website persistently.

Finally, five hours after registration began, the website came alive and the new registration time was posted. I checked social media for postings from the organizer but found nothing. Right at the new posted time, I started my registration process while thousands of runners kept venting their frustration. This time it only took me 20 minutes to complete my registration for the Popular Brooklyn Half.

The Project Management Takeaway
As project management professionals, we can face similar situations in the course of a project and need to be prepared with mitigation plans. In the case described above, communication with customers was not regular and sufficient, perhaps because the project team was too focused on solving the problem. This affected the customer experience.

In general, production problems have a resolution time window, which may vary depending on the seriousness of the issue. This is usually unknown for customers, but that does not hinder the communication process. We as project management practitioners need to consider that we are living in times dominated by instant gratification; customers expect that issues will be resolved immediately. At the same time, they expect frequent progress status reports.

As a project management practitioner, have you experienced a similar situation? If so, what did you do to keep your stakeholders/customers informed? What channels of communications did you use? How effective were they? Share your experiences with the community.

Posted by Conrado Morlan on: February 07, 2020 08:34 PM | Permalink

Comments (9)

Please login or join to subscribe to this item
Dear Conrado
Interesting is your perspective on the topic: "A Lesson About Communication in Times of Chaos"

Thanks for sharing

Maybe I started by trying to avoid the problem
Sometimes the sites do not work due to lack of programming

We agree that in crisis situations it is necessary to communicate effectively

How about starting by removing the site from the online and leaving an apology message, a forecast for the site to be online again and guaranteeing customers that everyone who wanted to participate could participate in the marathon

great topic, we have weekly meeting, and i think it is good way to inform all the stakeholders to be informed, as PM I am using any method for information and solving problem.

Congrats for the article, I enjoy your writing style. In the case of the online enrollment, it seems that heavy traffic risk to the website leading to failed registration attempts was not properly assessed. Otherwise, it would have been wise to let the buyers know upfront that issues could be encountered, suggesting what to do next.

Thanks for the topic! A rather strange question: is that picture from Brussels, Belgium? As a fellow runner, I recognise the road!

Hello Emily,
Thank you for taking the time to read the blog post.
I am not sure where the photo was taken. PMI provided the stock photo to for the block post.

Eduard,
Thank you for your comment.
I recently got an email from the organizer for another race and they mentioned that there may be delays in the registration process. I think they learned from the experience.

Ahmad,
I concur with you, communication with stakeholders is key at any stage of the process.

Luis,
Obrigado per ler o artigo!

Thanks Conrado. The communicartions strategy needs to be informed by each stakeholder's choice of method, delivery, frequency, detail etc of communication.

Please Login/Register to leave a comment.

ADVERTISEMENTS

You may have to fight a battle more than once to win it.

- Margaret Thatcher

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors