Project Management

7 Ways to Influence without Authority

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Categories: Careers, Leadership


By Sree Rao, PMP, PgMP, PMI-ACP

 

 

The ability to influence is one of the most valuable—and
underrated—leadership traits. It’s particularly important for program
managers, since we must influence cross-functional team members over
whom we may have some positional authority—but not enough to get things
done.

Here are 7 ways to influence:

1. Identify your style

We all have our own ways of trying to impact other people’s thinking and
actions. Chris Musselwhite and Tammie Plouffe identified five different
styles:
Rationalizing: Using logic and reason to advocate for a solution
Asserting: Stating ideas confidently to directly drive action
Negotiating: Finding favorable compromises without sacrificing the long-
term goal
Inspiring: Drawing on passion to open people’s eyes to new possibilities
Bridging: Resonating with others by listening and building coalitions

We often try to influence the way we like to be influenced—but that doesn’t
always work. Instead, try to match the style of the person you’re trying to
influence.

2. Establish trust

Influence is based on a foundation of trust and credibility that’s been
solidified over time. We cannot build trust overnight. The best way is to
continually deliver on your promises and be transparent when there are
roadblocks. Encourage others to express their honest opinions, concerns and
doubts, and give open, honest and constructive feedback.

3. Build social capital

Look beyond your role and offer help: Volunteer to pitch in on mentoring or
other company initiatives that you’re passionate about. You’ll get to network
with people across various departments and build social capital. Give help—
and then ask for help.

4. Think like a hotshot

Consider this as a variation of what former Focus Brands COO Kat Cole calls
the hotshot rule: Think of a colleague that you admire for their influencing
skills—aka, a hotshot. Now imagine if that colleague took over your role.
What would they immediately change? How would they interact with the
person you’re trying to influence? This might not be feasible in all situations
because of personality differences, but you can gain some insights from the
hotshot’s style.

5. Influence the influencer

If you’re trying to influence a team, identify the person on that team with
the most sway and influence them. And they will in turn influence the team.

6. Unlearn what you know

Keep an open mind and don’t write anyone off. There might be ways to win
over even the biggest skeptics. Initiate a conversation, acknowledging that
your view is different from the other person’s and have them help you
understand their perspective.

7. Know your value

The Cohen-Bradford influence model recommends that you think of what you
can offer in exchange for what you’re asking for. That can be your technical,
organizational or process knowledge, a tool, an expression of gratitude or
recognition, or help with tasks you have expertise in. Be mindful to do
something the other person values, which may not be what you value. As an
example, some people don’t like public recognition. Knowing that and
respecting that will go a long way.


Let me know your favorite influencing technique in the comments.

Posted by Sree Rao on: May 17, 2021 12:05 PM | Permalink

Comments (12)

Please login or join to subscribe to this item
Thanks for sharing, also acting with humility helps a lot!

Dear Sree
Very interesting the theme that brought to our reflection and debate
Thanks for sharing and for your opinions
I recently read a book by Dr Robert B. Cialdini on influence.
Recommend reading

Thanks for sharing. I'm definitely a negotiator, but my team recently shared with me that they like when a PM is willing to do things outside of their role for the betterment of the work. Although I wouldn't like to make a habit of doing that, this person falls into the influencer category above, so hearing how to gain their respect was helpful.

Thank you for sharing these insights

Hi Luis, thank you for the feedback and for the book recommendation. Will check it out. Sounds like a great book.

Oswaldo, agree with you. Humility helps. Thanks for pointing that out.

Loren, Great to know the feedback from your team. Agree that people appreciate PMs when they take on things outside their role and glad you called out that we shouldn't make a habit of it.

Kwiyuh, Yogeeta, you are welcome. Hope you found the tips helpful.

thanks

very helpful

Very important. Thanks for inputs. While identifying our own style is important, getting an understanding of other's style of getting influenced is also imperative. This is to strike the right chord to get things going.

Dear Sree, Thank you for sharing the useful technique! Some are simple way but always overlooked, or hard to action. My favorite technique is Establish Trust :)

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