Project Management

PMP Exam Tip: Calculating ES/FS

From the Certification Insider Blog
by
Cornelius Fichtner help you with your PMP Exam Prep (https://www.project-management-prepcast.com) as well as earn free PDUs (www.pm-podcast.com/pdu). Passing the PMP Exam is tough, but keeping your PMP Certification alive is just as challenging. Preparing for the exam requires an in-depth study of the PMBOK Guide and dedicated study discipline. And once you are PMP certified, then you are required to earn 60 Professional Development Units (PDUs) every 3 years to keep your certification alive. Let me help you make this journey easier with tips and tricks on how to prepare for and pass the exam as well as efficiently earning your PDUs once you are certified.

About this Blog

RSS

Recent Posts

Episode 465: Projects as Profit Centers - Part 1

Episode 462: Project Performance: Agile, Waterfall and Beyond #PMOT (Free)

Episode 460: Boost Your PMP Score #PMOT (Free)

Episode 459: Managing Multiple Projects #PMOT (Free)

Episode 458: Earn 60 Free PMP PDU #PMOT (Free)


Categories: PMP Exam Tip


We recently received the following question from a PMP Exam Student:
“There's some confusion in my head with regards to some of the network diagram calculations. I'm lead to believe there are actually two methods to calculate ES, LF, ES etc etc
 
The first method adds or subtracts 1 where applicable. This assumes that the start activity has ES, EF, LS and LF as 1. The second method assumes the start activity has zeros for all values thereby not having to add or subtract 1 to any of the formulas.

Is there any indication in the exam that would lead me into knowing which "method" is being utilised so that I can apply the right formula?”

I answered that he is correct. there are indeed 2 approaches:
- First approach: You calculate the network diagram starting on day 0
- Second approach: You calculate the network diagram starting on day 1

I personally use the second approach, because when my sponsor tells me, that my project starts on the first day of September, then that is September 1 and not September 0. This is also the way that all modern scheduling tools seem to work. You schedule your project based on a calendar start date and not "on day 0".

That is why there is a slight difference between the calculations (you have to add/subtract 1 from the results in the 2nd approach). However, don't worry about this for the exam too much. The way that the question is formulated you should be able to identify how to go about this. Also: I understand that in most cases when you have to calculate this, it is the end result that is important and not how you got there.

Posted on: August 10, 2011 05:25 AM | Permalink

Comments (0)

Please login or join to subscribe to this item


Please Login/Register to leave a comment.

ADVERTISEMENTS

"Comedy is tragedy - plus time."

- Carol Burnett

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors