Project Management

How to Measure Schedule Performance [Infographic]

From the The Money Files Blog
by
A blog that looks at all aspects of project and program finances from budgets, estimating and accounting to getting a pay rise and managing contracts. Written by Elizabeth Harrin from GirlsGuideToPM.com.

About this Blog

RSS

Recent Posts

The Benefits Management Process [Video]

Archiving Project Data

Key Achievements for Project Cost Management [Infographic]

Qualitative Risk Analysis: Process Overview

4 Tools for Managing Cost Control [Video]


Categories: metrics, scheduling


Someone emailed me the other day asking about how to use percent complete to track progress on their project schedule. It’s not the worst way to measure performance, but as I’ve got more experienced at putting schedules together, and the work I do is more uncertain, I’ve got less interested in using percent complete.

It means very little (at least, the way we were using it – which was basically a guess to feed into a schedule that was also mainly guessing given the level of complexity and uncertainty, and changes every week).

So I started thinking about schedule performance tracking – and there are plenty more ways to measure your progress than sticking to percent complete.

The infographic below shares some of the ways I know to measure your performance. You wouldn’t want to use them all on the same project necessarily, but it’s good to have options. Which ones do you use?

There’s a video here about schedule performance tracking measures if you would like some more information.

schedule performance tracking

Posted on: October 27, 2020 08:00 AM | Permalink

Comments (5)

Please login or join to subscribe to this item
Elizabeth, I found using Gantt chart useful. Tools like Primavera are good planning and scheduling tool.

I typically use progress my milestone and tracking gantt chart options. Nice infographic.

Very interesting, thanks for sharing.

Please Login/Register to leave a comment.

ADVERTISEMENTS

What a waste it is to lose one's mind. Or not to have a mind is being very wasteful. How true that is.

- Dan Quayle